Professors to study history, humanities this summer

Published on: May 13, 2010

The National Endowment for the Humanities Grant will allow three professors at Lone Star College-Kingwood an opportunity to go back into time to learn about the struggles and cultures of their chosen topics.

The NEH grant, which is federally funded, offers several week-long and intensive workshops/seminars during the summer for community college professors at a variety of historic locations. Sheryl Young, Steve Davis and Cindy Baker will be among the 500 professors who will participate in the program this year.

Young, an English and Professional Office Technology professor, will study “Building the New South: The Social and Economic Transformation of the Piedmont after the Civil War in Elon, N.C.” She is excited to study this point in history because she and Davis plan to teach an African-American history and English class next spring. The professor believes this topic fits in well with what they are and will teach in the future.

“I was thrilled to receive the grant because I am new to teaching in the humanities area so I wasn’t sure I could compete with other folks that had years of experience. It is an honor to be chosen for such an opportunity,” Young, who has taught at LSC-Kingwood for 26 years, said. “I really want to learn the history of this time period. Steve and I teach from Civil War to the present day. I am not as familiar with the Piedmont area as other areas in the South, so this will be a great learning opportunity.”

A faculty member at LSC-Kingwood since 1984, history professor Davis also teaches classes in Humanities as well as the history of Rock and Roll. During his week-long workshop, he will study “Landmarks of American Democracy: from Freedom Summer to the Memphis Sanitation Workers’ Strike in Memphis, Tenn., and Jackson, Miss.”  This is Davis’ third time to receive the grant. In 2007 he went to a workshop in Oxford, Miss., and Concord, Mass., in 2008.

“I was elated to being selected to study the 1960’s civil rights movement in Jackson and Memphis. It connects to my interests in social justice in American history and also to my musical interest as this part of the south is the birthplace of both the blues and rock and roll,” Davis said. “This will also be an excellent opportunity to get ideas for a course on the African-American experience in spring 2011.”

Baker, an English professor at Lone Star College-Kingwood since 2001, will travel to Freemont, Ohio, this summer to study “Progress and Poverty: The Gilded Age in American Politics and Literature from 1877 to 1901.”

“I was motivated to study this point in history because the topic is fascinating to me. I see this particular era as a pivotal time in U.S. History and literature,” Baker said. “From this experience, I would like to learn more about this time both in American History and American Literature. The reading list for the workshop is extensive; multiple articles and several books. I think it is obvious that this workshop is hands-on intensive study and I look forward to that.”

The National Endowment for the Humanities grant was given to community college instructors who can learn in the workshops and then bring that information back to their colleges. To apply for the grant, professors had to submit a resume, a letter of recommendation from their supervisor and an essay explaining their interests in their chosen topic and how it will benefit their college and teaching.

Register now for May mini-term, summer I, summer II and fall 2010 credit classes in one of three ways: phone, online or on campus.  Classes are offered days, evenings, or weekends in traditional, Internet, video, TV and independent study formats. Current students can register by telephone at 281-591-6625. Former and current students can register online at www.LoneStar.edu/registration

For general information about Lone Star College-Kingwood, call 281-312-1600 or visit our Web site at http://lonestar.edu/kingwood.htm

With more than 62,000 students in credit classes in spring 2010, Lone Star College System is the second largest and the fastest-growing community college system in Texas and the largest institution of higher education in the Houston area. LSCS consists of five colleges including LSC-CyFair, LSC-Kingwood, LSC-Montgomery, LSC-North Harris, and LSC-Tomball, six centers, LSC-University Park, LSC-University Center at Montgomery, LSC-University Center at University Park, Lone Star Corporate College, and LSC-Online. To learn more visit LoneStar.edu.