Man's Impact on Nature Explored by Artists

Published on: April 08, 2009

Exploring both the positive and negative effects of man's actions on the natural world is the purpose of a new outdoor art exhibition.

Human Nature Planted in Russ Pitman Park features the work of twelve Texas artists, including LSC-Kingwood art professor, Mari Omori.  The exhibition will run through May 2.   Russ Pitman Park is located at 7112 Newcastle in Bellaire.  Park hours are 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day.

Russ Pitman Park is a four-acre nature conservancy.  Omori says the show was organized by a friend of hers and she's happy to be a part of it.  She describes the park as land left uncultivated, where native and non-native species co-exist.  To get inspiration, she walked through the park and found it very beautiful and peaceful with large oak and pine trees.

Omori says, "The purpose of this show is to make evaeryone aware, one more time that nature has been there before human beings."

She says some artists will bring materials into the park and some will use materials already present to construct sculptural forms and explore the results.  "There might be some very disturbing effects when the artists bring this culture, or outside materials, into this nature.  Or, nature might embrace it.  We are going to explore all of this."

Omori's personal work came from the idea of the Japanese art of flower arrangement, called Ikebana.  She says she will use the natural resources already apparent in the park, but arrange them in as natural a way as possible, so that it blends perfectly and is almost unnoticeable.

Using simple materials, like string, Omori will create embroidery on leafs, bundle branches and more. 

"My work is going to be a very subtle, quiet way of using or incorporating simple materials."

The park exhibition is being coordinated by Urban Artists Studio and the Nature Discovery Center in Bellaire.  One of the missions of Urban Artists is to create sculpture that is community aware and environmentally conscious.  They work cooperatively with communities via exhibition, research, and collaboration.  For more information regarding this outdoor sculpture exhibition, contact June Woest at Urban Artists, 713-661-3483.

Register today for May Mini-term (May 11-29), Summer Term I (June 1-July 7), Summer Term II (July 9-Aug. 13) and Fall (Aug. 24-Dec. 13). Students can register in one of three ways: phone, online or on campus.  Classes are offered days, evenings, or weekends in traditional, Internet, video, TV and independent study formats. Current students can register by telephone at 281-519-6625. Former and current students can register online at Kingwood.LoneStar.edu/registration.

For general information about Lone Star College-Kingwood, call 281-312-1600 or visit our Web site at Kingwood.LoneStar.edu.

Lone Star College System consists of five colleges, including Cy-Fair, Kingwood, Montgomery, North Harris, and Tomball, six centers and the Lone Star College-University Center. With over 50,000 students, it is the largest college system in the Houston area, and third largest community college district in Texas.