Tu Camino Scholarship recipients receive full ride scholarship to LSC

Lone Star College, LSC Foundation and Univision Houston held a surprise reception at LSC-University Park to announce the three Tu Camino Scholarship recipients.

Lone Star College, LSC Foundation and Univision Houston held a surprise reception at LSC-University Park to award the first Tu Camino Essay Scholarship winners. The recipients received up to $15,000 and will have an LSC mentor to help them navigate the registration process to ensure they start their college career strong.  

"Lone Star College and Lone Star College Foundation partners with businesses like Univision Houston to help students take their first or last steps in their educational journey," said Nicole Robinson Gauthier, CFRE, LSC Foundation executive director. "Scholarships and education at Lone Star College changes lives."

Scholarship recipients Kenia Mojarro Mejia, Bianca Pecina and Nancy Segundo expressed their aspirations by reading their essays on their wish to achieve brighter futures by earning a degree, certification or transfer hours to attend a four-year institution. Also in attendance at the surprise reception were Valerie Jones, Ed.D., LSC-CyFair president, Melissa N. Gonzalez, Ph.D., LSC-Kingwood president and Virginia Fraire, LSC-University Park president, representing the campuses these students will attend.

"Univision Houston is proud to be at the forefront of helping students change the trajectory of their lives, which greatly benefits their families and the community at large," said Glenn L. Coleman, Univision Houston president and general manager. "We received a great response from people interested in this scholarship, showing a growing trend of community members who value and want access to higher education opportunities."

Mojarro Mejia, a daughter of immigrant parents from Mexico, has dedicated her life to working and taking care of her family. She plans to use her Tu Camino Scholarship to further her education and earn a degree in health care administration.

"I am proud of all my accomplishments, including a high school diploma and being a young mother," said Mojarro Mejia. "However, I want to further my education and be a role model for my family, young people and coworkers to motivate them to pursue their talents and calling. I understand school is a commitment and I am ready to attend classes while still being a full-time manager, mother, wife and friend." 

Mojarro Mejia will use her scholarship to attend LSC-Kingwood to gain the knowledge to become a welcoming bridge between the Hispanic community and health care.

When Pecina proudly showed off her teddy bear during "What Do You Want to Be When You Grow Up?" Day in second grade, she knew her calling was in health care. Winning the Tu Camino Scholarship connects her childhood desire to wear an oversized lab coat with her adult determination to make her career dreams a reality.

"This scholarship is not just about financial support; itís about embracing the dreams and aspirations that have guided me since childhood," said Pecina. "I can visualize myself in the same lab coat that I envisioned in the second grade, but now it would fit just right, symbolizing the journey and growth Iíve undertaken to reach this point."

Pecina plans to use her scholarship at LSC-University Park to accomplish her dream of working in health care to help others and to make her family proud. 

Segundo did not understand the value of education growing up, and at age 17, she left high school without a diploma or plan. When she became a mother, she realized that education was the key to success. After encouragement from social workers at her childrenís school, Segundo enrolled in the GED program in April 2022 and completed it in January 2023.

"I aspire to be a social worker so I can provide resources to help my community because Iíve seen how small actions, kindness and empathy can change someoneís life," said Segundo. "Receiving this scholarship will have a tremendous impact on me and my family and help me give back to the community." 

Segundo will use her scholarship at LSC-CyFair to learn techniques to help destigmatize mental illness in the Hispanic community and point them in the right direction toward helpful resources.

The Tu Camino Scholarship contest promoted the value of higher education in the Hispanic community. Nearly 200 people submitted essays entitled, "How a Lone Star College Scholarship will help me to a better career."