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Meaningfully Aligned Targeted Courses for Hispanic Students

MATCH helps ensure underserved students are receiving best-fit instruction based on proven methods and needs.

Curriculum Redesign Professional Development
DS English Alternative Delivery Options
Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)
English/Spanish Interpreter Certificate Program
Summer Math Bridge Program
Teaching Squares
Adjunct Boot Camp
21st Century Faculty Institute
Adjunct Mentoring Program
True North Chair Academy

 

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)

Based on WAC theory and practice, faculty are collaborating with certified writing tutors in the history and government classrooms to support students’ primary research and writing about their family’s local history and relationships with local government. Project Updates. Top

  • January 2017 - On January 31, 2017, the program manager and project director met with the four Developmental Studies (DS) English professors who are receiving release time to develop materials for use in alternative course delivery frameworks such as Non-Course Based Options (NCBOs), Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) and flipped classrooms at the lower level of DS instruction. The faculty are focusing on the scope, course delivery, and content materials to support ENGL 0304 Developmental Reading I and ENGL 0306 Developing Writing I. The Multimedia Studio will provide the appropriate technical support to deliver the content. It was recommended that the faculty look at the online materials developed by a math faculty at http://nhmath.lonestar.edu/Faculty/TurnellE/0308/0308.html that contain Instructor Notes, Videos, Quizzes, Assignments, and Answers as a model. As soon as the multimedia coordinator is hired, a meeting will be held with the new hire, the faculty and the LSC-North Harris instructional designer. The faculty were reminded that they needed to submit monthly Time and Effort forms.
  • March 2017 - In order to get a clearer picture of the students who typically place into the lowest developmental reading and writing classes, the four faculty members read and discussed research about students who demonstrate moderate to low executive functioning with the aim of addressing some needs of this population either through activities or outside intervention. After determining that these students needed more intensive instruction, the faculty are designing a four-day-a-week program to address a number of issues. These include building in the intensive work developmental students need, decreasing the time spent in developmental coursework, identifying additional supports to complete the DS sequence and gateway courses, and reducing the sequence of developmental classes to a scale that yields the best results. The faculty complied and analyzed the course-offering schedule for the last four semesters to make clear recommendations about the new delivery method of instruction, shared this blueprint with the DS English chair, interim dean, and fulltime faculty, and have received enthusiastic support.  After reviewing the student learning outcomes for the courses, the faculty determined that a portable assessment for both the reading and writing courses would benefit the instructors who receive the students after the first eight weeks are completed. Students who pass the course will progress to the integrated reading/writing course the second eight weeks.  Those who do not pass will enter a more targeted course of instruction based on the results of their portable assessments, tied to sample assignments and calibration training. Faculty are currently drafting rubrics and sample assessment activities as well as an online grammar/editing video module with sample exercises.
  • April 2017 - Faculty have worked in April to develop in more detail the course content to explore their concerns about student access to the materials, to consider how the format of their work will help the instructional designer once he begins, and to provide chair and dean with updates so that he can promote the program for the spring 2018 semester.  The team has spent much time during April structuring the course shells for ENGL 0304 Reading I and ENGL 0306 Writing I. The purpose of these shells is to aid them as they organize the specific activities they are developing to support the students. Tied to best practices and the course learning outcomes, faculty have scaffolded sample assignments that are not tied to any one instructor or book.  With the help of the instructional designer, they want to optimize ways for individual instructors to modify the specifics of their own assignments but provide them with a structure and sequence of activities that are likely to promote success. Besides the organizational piece, faculty have also explored various online materials to aid class instruction and to serve as resources for students outside class.  If a student misses class, she can access the online materials to stay caught up; if a student needs additional time to understand course assignments, the online materials become a powerful resource to draw on besides the printed texts.  Many of the struggling ENGL 0304 and ENGL 0306 students can benefit from multiple exposures to audio and visual texts, ones that are short and that target specific skills and strategies. 

    The more the team developed the structure and the materials, the more they realized they needed to begin conceptualizing the portable assessments.  They spent a number of meetings discussing the kinds of assessment that would best reflect the mastery of the course outcomes for ENGL 0304 and ENGL 0306.  Currently, they are in the process of developing specific samples of final exams for these courses.  These exams, like the materials in the course shells, are not meant to be the only exams used; instead, they are to demonstrate the kind of final assessment that evaluates how well students can demonstrate mastery of course outcomes.  Specifically, a guiding principle is to create exams/capstone projects that ask students to demonstrate the skills and strategies they have been learning all semester with fewer scaffolded activities.  The team feels strongly that the students should be presented with a final based on the semester’s instruction and the course learning outcomes.  As the faculty worked on the course materials, they had to confront the issue of in-class student access to the electronic materials.  Because the division has so few computer classrooms and finding regular access to electronic classrooms has become more difficult over the last few years, they realized they needed to explore ways they might guarantee greater amounts of computer time during class.  It has been usual practice for the upper-level DS and college English classes to be assigned to the computer classrooms.  As the writing programs move more to multi-modal forms of composition, the chances of being assigned to computer classrooms will become even more problematic.  While it is true that ENGL 0304 and ENGL 0306 students can tap into the materials out of class through D2L, the Lone Star learning management system, much of the curricular work that the faculty have done requires in-class access as well.  The team has created an online repository in D2L of all the documents they have created and the materials they have collected so that they can continue to refine all materials at any time.  As they complete the project, they will be able to finalize materials for easy access by others outside the team.  Because they are at the end of the semester and the instructional designer has not begun working on the project yet, the faculty have worked to develop storyboards so that once the designer begins in mid-May, he will have access to the materials and can begin to read and analyze them.  The team members will make themselves available to the designer this summer as he has the opportunity to design and develop their web presence. 
  • May 2017 - As the semester ends as well as the course release time to work on class format and materials, the Title V Match Team for Developmental English commented on their progress, their next steps, and their concerns and recommendations.

    The intent is to have a clear method for course assessment by the fall to pilot in the English 0304 and English 0306 classes taught by Title V Team members and other interested faculty.  This distributed assessment is tied to sample assignments and calibration training. Finally, they recognize that strong assessment of outcomes can affect best classroom practices and ensure consistency of standards across sections. To promote this stance, they have designed assessments that avoid the testing of discrete activities and skills.  The assessment cycle also allows for continued teaching throughout the semester as instructors assess steps in the processes.  The team currently has the final assessment completed for English 0306 Writing I and are in the process of completing the final for 0304 Reading I.  Faculty members have worked to tie the assessments to the specific course outcomes listed for each course.  Besides developing a model for English 0306 final, they have collected sample student portfolios and had them digitized. These samples from a spring 2017 section of Writing I will serve as the initial anchor set used for calibration training in the fall. Because much of the work faculty have done relies on students’ having electronic access to class materials and resources, the Title V Team has submitted a proposal for purchasing mobile laptops for Developmental English.  Wanting to ensure that students in Reading I and Writing I have equal access to relevant pedagogy, the Team wishes to address the fact that the current classrooms do not have the kind of learning environment students need.  Besides securing access through mobile laptops, the Team has formulated other ideas listed under Concerns and Recommendations.To best use the instructional designer, the Team discussed the strategies for collaborating with him.  They are planning to have him meet with the faculty teaching this summer, sitting in on some classes to understand the workings of Reading I and Writing I.  As faculty continue to finalize and annotate the documents over the course of the summer, they want the designer to familiarize himself with the various documents and activities they have developed so that in the fall when he begins his work, the Team, in collaboration with the designer, can develop delivery methods that follow best practices.  Understanding that this designer will have responsibilities other than working with the DS English Team, the faculty expect that the designer’s priority in the fall will be to complete the work for Developmental English so that it can be fully operational by the spring when the project moves to a full pilot, involving all the sections.  The designer’s work will be crucial if the support the DS English students need to be successful is embedded in the classes.Besides the work of the instructional designer in the fall, the Team has developed a plan for the first stages of professional development.  Since the faculty will be piloting all the materials they have developed for the project so far, excluding the 8-week/8-week format, they want to invite all the lower level DS English faculty to participate in the limited pilot in the fall.  The team plans to invite anyone teaching the targeted courses, as well as anyone interested in teaching one in the future, to join a group meeting regularly.  They plan to start with the assessment instruments and set up a training schedule based on what their colleagues wish to focus on.  Focusing in the beginning on assessment allows faculty to acquaint their colleagues with the range of skill level entering students have, as well as show their fellow teachers the kind of progress that is possible.  This part of the training is especially important since people teaching the courses for the first time can be easily overwhelmed in the beginning of the semester.  This strategy will allow the team to acquaint faculty with the work they have done, to provide materials they have developed, and to discuss pedagogical concerns.  As a part of their professional development plan, the team will collaborate with the Writing Center to involve their tutors as well.
    Next Steps:
  1. Complete a draft of the Reading I Distributed Final Assessment for the course.
  2. Complete the two editing tools for electronic access: 1) Creating Error Logs and 2) Creating Handbooks. 
  3. Meet with the instructional designer to open discussions and map out a plan for completing the project in the fall.  For instance, the team has developed storyboards for the student materials to creating videos that capture and model the various stages of the reading and writing processes, but they are unsure how this goal might be accomplished. Students struggle with their literacy because they lack strategic approaches, but in any given section, only so much class time can be devoted to these activities.  Faculty therefore look forward to their collaboration with the instructional designer. 
  • June 2017 - The WAC Specialist coordinated with student tutors and the faculty lead to design multiple instructional materials in two history courses for Summer I. Instructional materials including using primary and secondary history texts for course writing projects (individual and small groups) and all materials were translated into Spanish and Vietnamese, considering the multicultural student body of Lone Star College-North Harris. Initial response by students is positive.  Consent forms authorized by Lone Star College Institutional Review Board were distributed to accumulate student-writing artifacts to be analyzed by the WAC specialist and a full report generated at the end of summer will be returned to the professors. Based on analysis, additional suggestions for History writing will be provided. 
    he WAC specialist expanded recommendations for WAC reading strategies and these materials will be completed by July 2017.   Student tutors were embedded in one Freshman English course for in-class support. Although the grant was designed for History and Government classes, insufficient interest by those departments permitted additional support in Freshman English. Students were permitted to have face-to-face support in in-class exercises and established additional working relationships after class. Because of the Writing Center schedule limitations (closing 2:00 when students also finish their classes) the WAC Coordinator permitted extended student tutor support from 2:00-3:00 on two days per week, and students took advantage of this extra time.   The faculty lead contacted LSC-Greenspoint Center and LSC-Victory Center to expand WAC writing support and will introduce the program in July. The project lead has also received data from the Lone Star College Analytics and Institutional Reporting (AIR) department for potential new tutor hires for coming academic year and training.
     
  • July 2017 - The first student writing artifacts and consent forms have been collected and are currently being analyzed by The WAC Specialist. They will be returned to professors early to mid-August with additional suggestions for History writing. The WAC Specialist will also send expanded recommendations for WAC reading strategies. Although interest in the History and Government classes is still emerging, the peer tutors were requested for two History classes in Summer I. Based on instructor responses and student survey results, the in class support has been positive. Using the AIR (Analytics and Institutional Reporting) data the project lead and WAC coordinator will began the process for new tutor hires for the upcoming semester. The project lead met with LSC-Greenspoint and LSC-Victory Centers to expand WAC writing support, but as a result of the recent personnel changes will hold until they express commitment.
     
  • August 2017 - After analyzing several dozen writing artifacts, the WAC Specialist provided reports and recommendations for more History professors’ assignments and assessment. Two reports (Attachment B) highlight increasing awareness of a) writing process strategies, b) on-campus writing support such as Title V tutoring and extended writing center times, and c) increased information literacy to support history assignments to support the SLO’s (student learning outcomes).
    The reports have several sections that include an analysis of student projects, disciplinary frameworks to support college writing, data of the student projects, and recommendations for assignments and writing instruction in History.
    Overall, the WAC specialist concluded that most students misunderstood the assignment and lacked sufficient college conventions appropriate for college-level writing. Especially concerning were student awareness of using texts and how they read texts for writing-as-learning critical thinking. Moreover, the analysis highlighted the fact that evening students had not been seriously addressed, either by the LSC-NH Writing Center or by the WAC initiative.
     
  • September 2017 - The peer writing tutors have had an extended opportunity to not only be embedded into classes, but to assist groups of history students with their writing assignments at one time. The peer tutor coordinator reserved computers in the Learning Center for groups of History students to come for research and to ask questions while working on their writing assignments as the peer tutors assisted. During four class sessions, the tutors were able to assist 83 History 1301 students this month. Peer writing tutors are also currently working to assist students in the Writing Center as well.
    WAC members met with a representative from the Psychology Department and is preparing to expand and incorporate Psychology 2314 (Life-Span Growth and Development) in the near future. Training modules are currently being created to effectively train our peer tutors to meet the needs of students for writing success.
     
  • October 2017 - The Title V  peer writing tutors participated in all-campus Writing Week Oct. 16-18, 2017, where they helped students with ideas for formulating successful writing projects and classwork assignments from various subject areas. The tutors have continued to support history and government students in the Learning Center A200, as well as the Writing Center A115. This month they assisted 55 students. The tutors studied and completed exercises on different publication formatting styles, to better prepare themselves for future assistance to students in the Psychology department.
     
  • November 2017 -  This month the Peer Writing Tutors assisted 31 students who visited the Learning Center as well as the Writing Center for History/Government support.  Tutors were also embedded into one history class where they assisted students with the development of project papers, edited thesis statements and outlines. They later provided one-on-one assistance and facilitated those who preferred to work in groups. The tutors were given an opportunity to speak before a class to share their suggestions about how students should approach writing. Their responses were well received and the instructor stated, “They were excellent and the specialized training that you’re giving them is perfect.”  Tutors participated in a training workshop where they analyzed general tutoring practices and responded with best practices to bring writing success resolution.  Next month, the tutors will be re-visiting History classes to conduct surveys and collect consent forms for analysis by our coordinator and WAC specialist for future growth and development in writing and tutor support.
     
  • December 2017 - Peer Writing Tutors continued to be available in the Learning Center and the Writing Center to assist with History/Government support. This month the tutors visited (five) 5 history and government classes to distribute surveys and consent forms to gain feedback on tutor support and effectiveness, as well as to grant access for the students’ writing assignments to be analyzed and archived by the WAC specialist for future research and development. These surveys and student projects will be analyzed in January 2018.
    The tutors participated in a training workshop where they demonstrated understanding and clarity of articles using their writing summary strategies. They later practiced formatting example references based on different formatting styles, MLA, APA, etc., for future tutoring purposes.
    In January 2018, the tutors will be involved in more training and enrichment opportunities as the semester moves ahead. As a result of positive feedback and increased interest, they are presently scheduled to be embedded in classes once the semester begins. The faculty lead will focus in January on examining more cross-college writing theory and research, beyond History and Government courses.
     
  • January 2018 - Peer Writing Tutors began the semester with a re-orientation workshop on January 24, 2018 followed by presentations in a History and a Psychology class. 
    This month the tutors were embedded into two (2) History classes assisting 70 students with writing research, and formatting styles. These peer-tutors directed eight visits in the Learning Center (ACAD) and Writing Center (ACAD 115).  They continue to be available in the Learning Center A200 and the Writing Center A115 to assist with WAC support. Throughout, we emphasis contemporary writing process theory and emphasizing the dialogic socializing of writing projects. 
    Bi-weekly, the tutors practice and complete training exercises to increase their understanding and ability to support students in various areas of research and writing theory. The peer-tutors are currently scheduled to visit and be embedded in more classes in February. We have also added two (2) additional peer-tutors to replace former tutors because of graduation or otherwise attrition. Fall 2017 writing documents are in the process of being reviewed and analyzed by the WAC Specialist. Professors Bruce Martin and Lane Fletcher hosted a session on Writing Across the Curriculum in the pre-semester Faculty Institute. There, they emphasized the need of social, cognitive writing assignments and assessment. Representatives from Math, History, English, Arts, Developmental English, and Government professors discussed their projects. Bruce Martin followed with suggestions for a) student blogging, and b) a draft bibliography for writing in Mathematics to increase learning retention.  Professor Martin has collaborated with an additional History professor to revise his HIST 1302 writing project, emphasizing social writing and peer-tutors as part of the process. We also built additional materials for a Psychology course.  
     
  • February 2018 - This month, the peer writing tutors were embedded into six History 1301 class sections supporting students with the writing process, including invention ideas and revisions. The peer-tutors also made presentations in four classes with hope of assisting more students with writing projects in the near future. Thirty individual students visited with tutors in the Learning Center and provided positive feedback in February 2018.
    Student feedback includes:
    1. “Very Helpful.”
    2. “Helped explain my research paper a lot more, made me feel comfortable with my sources.”
    3. “Helped me with ideas.”
    Throughout the month, the project lead developed weekly training exercises for the peer tutors emphasized with contemporary writing research and WAC best practices, which enhanced their skills and ability. Weekly, peer-tutors are expected to read contemporary research of published articles, assess other peer tutor videos related to different social practices, dialogue with one another, share ideas and provide suggestions or solutions as to how they believe problems can be solved, and practice student writing projects for effective dialogic learning.
    The project lead is in the process of assessing History writing projects from 2017 Fall, and will provide assignment design and assessment recommendations for those professors.
     
  • March 2018 - This month the Peer Writing Tutors along with the faculty lead have been visiting the classrooms of participating History, Government and Psychology instructors to explain the Institutional Review Board and consent process in an effort to gain student participation in the Writing across the Curriculum analysis. They have been able to obtain 110 consents for review. Once these documents are received and anonymized, the faculty lead will read and create an analysis for review and for future strategic planning.
    Throughout the month, the Peer Writing Tutors actively assisted 51 students in the Learning Center. They were embedded into two classes supporting 46 students with revisions and editing drafts.
    Each month the Peer Writing Tutors continually participate in training workshops where they are expected to respond to various articles, writing samples, videos and discussions with fellow colleagues. They demonstrate understanding and clarity using their writing and tutoring experiences as these continue to expand. In April 2018, the tutors are scheduled to be embedded in more classes for training and enrichment opportunities.
     
  • April 2018 -  During April, 83 students received assistance from the WAC peer tutors on generating ideas, making revisions, editing and formatting. This increase of attendance reflects the end of semester and students’ final projects. Tutors were also embedded into two classes (History and English 1301) where they discussed the students’ thesis statements and outlines, and provided feedback and suggestions about content, delivery, and the structure of the students’ power point slides.More student survey results yielded the following remarks:
    1. “…very patient, calm, helpful and definitely an asset.”
    2. “Amazing visit, I got all the help I needed.”
    3. “Easy to understand. Cleared up all of my confusion and answered all of my questions.”
    The tutors also participated in Writing Week April 23-26, 2018, sponsored by the English Department.  The project lead and peer tutor coordinator are in the process of collecting student documents from the History and Psychology participating courses for anonymization, analysis and review. The goal is for the final reports to be complete by June 10, 2018. Once the review is finalized, the project lead and coordinator will be available to meet instructors for face-to-face or in-department meetings to share findings and recommendations.
     
  • June 2018 -  This month the Peer Writing Tutors had 25 visitors in the Learning Center. The tutors primarily assisted the students with revisions, editing and formatting.  The project lead completed and distributed the writing analysis and recommendations to the psychology instructors. The reports highlight increasing awareness of a) writing process strategies, b) on-campus resources such as Title V tutoring and c) increased information literacy to support psychology assignments and the SLO’s (student learning objectives). The project lead and the WAC Coordinator will be available to meet instructors for face-to-face or in-department meetings to share findings and recommendations. The remaining history reports will be completed and distributed prior to the fall semester.  In preparation for the fall, the project lead and the WAC coordinator will begin the process of hiring new tutors using the AIR (Analytics and Institutional Reporting) system.  Data for the fall 2017 and spring 2018 WAC sections show that the completion rate for WAC sections was 3% higher (88% vs. 85%), the success over completion 10% higher (75% vs. 65%), and the success over enrollment 24% higher (66% vs. 42%) than non-WAC sections taught by the same professors. 
     
  • July 2018 - This month the Peer Writing Tutors had four visitors in the Learning Center. The tutors primarily assisted the students with brainstorming ideas and formatting. In addition, the tutors were embedded in a summer English class to observe and assist students.
    The faculty lead continued distributing the writing analysis and recommendations to history and psychology instructors.  The reports highlight increasing awareness of a) writing process strategies, b) on-campus resources such as Title V tutoring and c) increased information literacy to support history and psychology assignments and the SLO’s (student learning outcomes). Both the faculty lead and WAC coordinator will be available to meet instructors for face-to-face or in-department meetings to share findings and recommendations. The remaining reports will be completed and distributed prior to the fall semester. Interest in the Writing Across the Curriculum project is increasing as the WAC coordinator has begun receiving requests from instructors for tutor embedment during the fall.  Also in preparation for the fall, the project lead and the WAC coordinator will continue the process of hiring new tutors using AIR (Analytics and Institutional Reporting). Finally, WAC has expanded to HIST 1302, PSYC 2301, PSYC 2314, ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302. During the 2017-2018 academic year, 540 students were enrolled in WAC sections. WAC students had higher completion and success rates than students did in non-WAC sections taught by the same professor as seen in the table below.


Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)

2017-2018

 
  • August 2018 -  Originally, the Title V Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) project was for History and Government faculty to collaborate with certified writing tutors in the HIST and GOVT classrooms to support students’ primary research and writing about their family’s local history and relationships with local government. Electronic copies of these 3-5 page-writing projects and copies of primary sources were to be archived for long-term research. It was expected that History professors, for example, would use students’ family histories to be part of the larger conversation of the Houston-area and create a new college archive for long-term scholarly research. Similarly, we expected Government professors to develop students’ analysis of local government influence on their lives, again for the archive. Though these goals were shared, few professors looked for opportunities to either include new writing projects in their courses, or change the current writing projects. As this report highlights most writing assignments are neither local nor inclusive in the students’ experiences as part of history and government.
    In reality, few HIST/GOVT professors expressed interest in local topics and the Title V grant immediately became an embedded writing support for the departments. Specifically, the professors asked for
    1. Assistance with assignment design
    2. Embedded student peer tutor support
    3. Out-of-class student peer tutor support, and
    4. Assignment assessment
    What we found were the few participating HIST and GOVT faculty walked away from localizing history and government in student life and continued traditional history and government models. This description is not a criticism, but, in fact, attempts to support the HIST 1301 student learning outcomes to 1) create an argument through the use of historical evidence; 2) analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources; and 3) analyze the effects of historical, social, political, economic, cultural, and global forces on this period of United States history. These SLOs are very integrated in writing as a social, meaning-making act and effective writing assignment and assessment design would support stronger learning. Specifically, a series of strong writing assignments around argument, use of historical evidence, and analysis and interpretation of primary and secondary sources would support short- and long-term learning for our students.  Moreover, it overlooks the opportunity to bridge students’ literacy experiences, create awareness of their lives in history and in government, and validate their presence in the community, as well as preventing important scholarship of an emerging space. The Title V grant was originally designed to support Hispanic Serving Institutions to bridge some cultural, discursive, literacy gaps between -- especially -- first- and second-generation migrant students. The assignments, however, do not mention the Hispanic experience except for Spanish colonization and rarely mention how Hispanic Americans have been affected by the dominant culture, nor how Hispanic Americans have influenced the country.
     
  • September 2018 - This month WAC tutors completed presentations in ten classes and were embedded in five. They supported students throughout the month from various courses including sociology, history, English and others who requested assistance with “how to” research topics, brainstorm, formulate cohesive ideas, revise and edit papers, as well as receive help with how to properly cite sources. The peer tutor coordinator accommodated our History classes by reserving space in the Learning Center A200 for groups of history students to each have access to a computer while they conversed and received assistance from our tutors in accordance with their instructor’s assignment details.  With an increased interest in WAC tutor support staff is in the process of interviewing and hiring more applicants to assist with the growing needs of our students.


PUENTE Program)

Lone Star College-North Harris is implementing the PUENTE Project model to prepare students for transfer to four year universities.  Students take a rigorous two-course English class sequence (Developmental Studies English and college-level English) and EDUC 1300, the first time in college course, taught by a PUENTE-trained instructor and a counselor/advisor. The taproot of PUENTE success is its professional development program for teachers and advisors. These trainings provide the tools to deliver PUENTE’s threefold program of extensive writing instruction, sustained academic advising and personal mentoring. The classes provide a supportive environment with a focus on multicultural literature. Students work closely with the counselor/advisor to prepare an academic plan, focus on academic and professional goals, and transfer to a four-year university.

  • May 2018 - A team of four LSC-NH faculty and staff members attended the PUENTE program training.  The Mission of the Puente Project is to increase the number of educationally underserved students who earn Associate Degrees, earn Certificates and who enroll in four-year institutions, and return to their community as mentors and leaders. The PUENTE project is about intensive writing instruction, sustained academic advising, community leadership, professional development and assessment. The team learned about not only the program but also received hands-on training on how better to implement these activities.   

English/Spanish Interpreter Certificate Program

Creates a certificate program in Spanish/English Interpretation to provide professional training for students who wish to undertake rigorous and challenging careers as bilingual interpreters. Project Updates. Top

  • December 2016 - The Language Lab was moved to a larger location to accommodate the interpreter stations. A description and outline for the Bilingual English/Spanish Interpreting Program were written and program outcomes and learning outcomes for the seven courses comprising the program developed.
  • February 2017 - A meeting was held on February 3, 2017 to discuss the development and implementation of the program. Draft documents that included the purpose of the program, requirements, course descriptions, learning outcomes, evaluation procedures and admission requirements were distributed and discussed. The project lead will use these as a foundation as he develops the curriculum. A syllabus for each course and oral Spanish and English entry and exit exams will likewise be developed. The goal is to market the program in September 2017 with an implementation date of spring 2018. The project lead will fill out Time and Effort Reports to track his hours as well as a Memorandum of Additional Assignment (MOAA).   The LSC-North Harris Career and Technical Education interim director will check to see if a 210-hour CE Program needs approval by the Workforce Council. The program will consist of seven courses with 30 hours for each course. There was a question about whether these courses are currently in the Workforce Education Course Manual (WECM). The project director commented that she had written to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board asking this question and they had responded that we needed to develop the courses as special topics, and then submit them for approval as a new workforce program.   Ideas for obtaining curriculum and materials were discussed. It was commented that the University of Texas at Brownsville had received a FIPSE grant from the U.S. Department of Education to develop a Spanish Translation Online Program, which included an instructor manual, course summaries, and detailed lessons, and that these could be accessed at http://myutb.blackboard.com/. In addition, using materials published on line or purchasing Sanako software were alternative suggestions.  The CE interim director will develop a recruitment flyer to take to the Houston Hispanic Forum for distribution. Other recruitment ideas included hospitals and the Association of Hispanic Professionals (ProSpanica), as well as direct marketing to graduating students of our ESOL Program. Finally, we are looking into institutional membership to the Houston Interpreters and Translators Association. The program manager will request permission from the DOE to pay $100 for institutional membership.
     
  • March 2017 - The Career and Technical Education interim director confirmed that the Bilingual Interpreter Certificate program needed approval of the Lone Star College Workforce Council. The program director submitted the Workforce Program Development Research Request, which included a description of the program and identified as the source of interest the Title V Hispanic-Serving Institution grant. 
     
  • April 2017 - The Lone Star College Workforce Council approved the Bilingual Interpreter Certificate program at their April meeting. The Workforce Program Development office has assigned rubrics and course numbers for the assessment test and the seven courses that comprise the program based on the current workforce education courses available in the Workforce Education Course Manual (WECM) in compliance with the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) guidelines. These are:
    • FRNL 2100101                       Assessment Test
    • FRNL 2100102                       Introduction to the Interpreting Profession
    • FRNL 2100103                       Interpreting Techniques
    • FRNL 2100104                        Consecutive Interpreting and Sight Translation
    • FRNL 2100105                       Simultaneous Interpreting
    • FRNL 2100106                       Interpreting in Business/Commercial Settings
    • FRNL 2100107                       Interpreting in Medical Settings
    • FRNL 2100108                       Interpreting in Legal Settings 
      The project lead has developed the entry-level assessment test in English and Spanish. The exam is designed for individuals who are bilingual in English and Spanish. The four-section test consists of English grammar, Spanish grammar, English oral section, and Spanish oral section. All candidates who pass the written and oral entry exam are eligible to enroll in the Bilingual Interpreting Program. Moreover, the lead has created the syllabi for Introduction to the Interpreting Profession and Interpreting in Medical Settings. He has also conducted an online search and contacted several publishers for appropriate materials to use in the program. Finally, an 8-person Wireless Simultaneous Translation System is being purchased and marketing materials are being developed to promote the program.
  • July 2017 - The project lead has searched different websites and contacted several publishers looking for books that can be used for Consecutive Interpreting, Interpreting in Legal Settings, and Interpreting Techniques. In addition, he has created the syllabi for these courses.
     
  • August 2017 - The Title V project director and program manager met with the project lead and the interim director of Continuing Education to discuss the implementation of the Bilingual Interpreter Certificate Program. It was decided that the program would begin on January 29, 2018. The two beginning classes (co-requisites) are Introduction to the Interpreting Profession and Interpreting Techniques. All the interpreter classes will meet two days a week for three hours for five weeks in the evening. Classes will be held in classrooms in the Academic Building and in the Language Lab. A flyer and a screen promotion of the program are to be developed and sent to the system Continuing Education Office for approval no later than October 1, 2017 and will be ready for use by November 15.
    To recruit the instructors, the project lead is consulting with Houston Community College and the Houston Interpreters and Translators Association (HITA). The college has joined HITA with an institutional membership and this will be another medium for promoting the Bilingual Interpreting Certificate Program.The project lead is searching for podcasts than can be used for Interpreting in Medical Settings and a book for Interpreting in Business/Commercial Settings, and has created the syllabus for the latter. He revised the syllabi for Interpreting Profession, Interpreting Techniques, Consecutive Interpreting and Sight Translation, Simultaneous Interpreting, Interpreting in Medical Settings, and Interpreting in Legal Settings to a CE format. He obtained quotes for a multi-user Interpretation System for classroom interpreting sessions and has selected equipment from Congress Network Corporation, which aligns well with our budget and courses. A Bilingual Interpreter Certificate Program brochure has been designed.  CLick her for a copy: The Title V project director and program manager met with the project lead and the interim director of Continuing Education to discuss the implementation of the Bilingual Interpreter Certificate Program. It was decided that the program would begin on January 29, 2018. The two beginning classes (co-requisites) are Introduction to the Interpreting Profession and Interpreting Techniques. All the interpreter classes will meet two days a week for three hours for five weeks in the evening. Classes will be held in classrooms in the Academic Building and in the Language Lab. A flyer and a screen promotion of the program are to be developed and sent to the system Continuing Education Office for approval no later than October 1, 2017 and will be ready for use by November 15.To recruit the instructors, the project lead is consulting with Houston Community College and the Houston Interpreters and Translators Association (HITA). The college has joined HITA with an institutional membership and this will be another medium for promoting the Bilingual Interpreting Certificate Program.  The project lead is searching for podcasts than can be used for Interpreting in Medical Settings and a book for Interpreting in Business/Commercial Settings, and has created the syllabus for the latter. He revised the syllabi for Interpreting Profession, Interpreting Techniques, Consecutive Interpreting and Sight Translation, Simultaneous Interpreting, Interpreting in Medical Settings, and Interpreting in Legal Settings to a CE format. He obtained quotes for a multi-user Interpretation System for classroom interpreting sessions and has selected equipment from Congress Network Corporation, which aligns well with our budget and courses. 
    A Bilingual Interpreter Certificate Program brochure has been designed.  Please click on link:     Bilingual Interpreter Brochure
     
  • September 2017 - There was a meeting on September 28, 2017 with the project lead, the project manager, and the interim Continuing Education director to discuss the implementation of the program in January 2018. The project lead will send the course syllabi to the interim Continuing Education director and the classes will be built by October 13. Drafts of the marketing materials have been sent to the system Workforce Education Office for approval and printing and emphasis was placed on having the materials ready by October 13, 2017 in order to recruit students from the present ESOL classes for the new Interpreter Training program.  Continuing Education will process the hiring of the instructors for the classes. The project lead will research the requirement for the position and interview the candidates as well as assist in recruiting through the local interpreters association of which he is now a member. Although the next meeting of the Houston Interpreters organization is not until November, the lead will contact them about putting an ad on their website and pursue possible recruits at Houston Community College.
    It was recommended that the instructors come on board before being hired for the teaching position to assist with the testing and meet with the lead to expand the materials. Possibly, they could be contracted as a consultant prior to their teaching assignment. The project manager is checking to see if this would be possible. There are still funds available for curriculum development.
    The project lead brought three equipment quotes for the interpreter equipment to the meeting. He will analyze the equipment quotes to show the exact items, so the quotes will be equivalent and will send this information to the project manager who will review, approve and facilitate the ordering.
    During September, the project lead searched various websites and contacted several publishers looking for books that can be used for the Interpreting in Business/Commercial Settings class. Moreover, he searched for podcasts for the Medical and Legal settings classes to help students to practice/improve their interpreting skills. These podcasts will be available to students in the Language lab. Finally, he searched for the experience and education requirements needed to start the faculty hiring-process.
     
  • December 2017 - In December, the program recruited, interviewed and hired two well-qualified faculty to teach the proposed courses in the new program. In addition, the project lead met with a University of Houston-Downtown faculty member with more than 30 years of experience in the fields of translation and interpreting. The UHD program focuses on Court and Medical Reporting and in its second year is expanding.
     
  • January 2018 - In January, the Interpreter Training Lab was completed.  It was fitted with 6 consoles, 12 headsets, a microphone, and a master unit.  An additional fifteen hours of Podcast material have been added to the interpreting material that will be used by the students.  The first class is scheduled for March 18. The program recruiting brochures have been completed and student recruitment has begun.
     
  • March 2018 - During the month of March, the program was re-designed. Instead of the original set of seven classes, the program will be divided into two levels of interpreting programs. The Foundational Interpreting Program (96 hours) and the Advanced Interpreting Program. The Foundational Interpreting Program is oriented to entry-level interpreters. It includes training in community, medical (42 hours), and legal interpreting (42 hours). The Advanced Interpreting Program (96 hours) is oriented to trained and/or experienced interpreters. In addition, it includes training in court (21 hours) and conference interpreting (63 hours). These programs are very relevant both for the future interpreter and for the interpreting profession because they are based on ethics, standards of practice and competencies development. The first classes are scheduled for implementation in fall 2018.
     
  • April 2018 - In this month, 83 students received assistance generating ideas, revisions, editing and formatting help with our WAC Peer Writing tutors. This increase of attendance reflects the end of semester and students’ final projects. They were also embedded into two (2) classes (History and English 1301) where they discussed the students’ thesis statements and outlines. Peer Tutors provided feedback and suggestions about content, delivery, and the structure of the students’ power point slides.  More student survey results yielded the following remarks:
    1. “…very patient, calm, helpful and definitely an asset.”
    2. “Amazing visit, I got all the help I needed.”
    3. “Easy to understand. Cleared up all of my confusion and answered all of my questions.”
    The tutors also participated in Writing Week April 23-26, 2018, sponsored by the English Department.  Professor Bruce Martin, along with the Peer Tutor Coordinator, are in the process of collecting student documents for anonymization, analysis and review by History and Psychology participating courses. The goal is for the final reports to be complete by 10 June 2018, after which time, the instructors will be notified. Martin and Jenkins-Berry will be available to meet instructors for face-to-face or in-department meetings to share findings and recommendations.  Peer writing tutors will cease from working the 2nd week in May at the end of the semester, but will resume during Summer 1 session.
     
  • May 2018 - May was a partial month, as most students’ writing projects were due before May or in the first week. Thus, only eight students received assistance with revisions, editing and formatting help from the WAC Peer Writing tutors. Because of graduation and or transfers, a couple of the peer writing tutors will be leaving the college; therefore, the WAC coordinator will begin the process of hiring new tutors for the fall 2018 semester. The faculty lead along with the peer tutor coordinator completed the process of collecting student documents for anonymization, analysis and review by History and Psychology participating courses. The final reports are expected to be complete by June 2018, after which the instructors will be notified of the analysis and suggestions for improved writing assignments and assessment. Faculty and staff will be available to meet instructors for face-to-face or department meetings to share findings and recommendations. 
     
  • August 2018 -  The first course of the newly designed English/ Spanish Interpreter Program began on August 13 with eight students. A Texas State certified interpreter was hired to teach the Foundational Interpreting class. In August, nine students were pre- tested and placed in the Program. Lab hours have been extended to accommodate the students’ schedules.  Spanish/English practice materials have been purchased to help students enhance their interpreting skills and receive language practice on the Interpreter Lab Stations. The legal Interpretools provide practice in all three modes of interpretation, different types of specialized expert witness discourse, and the formulaic language of the courts. The medical Interpretools help students to build specialized skills and acquire vocabulary used in prevalent situations in the health care field. By drawing experience of working interpreters and the use of authentic real-world scenarios, these materials are fine-tuning students’ skills and preparing them for certification exams.
  • August 2019 - 

Summer Math Bridge Program

Prepares graduating seniors in the summer immediately following high school graduation while math concepts are still fresh in their minds for the math courses required to meet their academic and career goals at LSC-North Harris. Project Updates. Top

  • October 2017 - A request was sent to the U.S. Department of Education requesting to reallocate funding for the Summer Math Refresher to the Summer Math Bridge Program. The reason for the request is since LSC-North Harris Title V grant was written over 16 months ago, the Summer Math Refresher has been developed, and funding is no longer required for this initiative.

  • November 2017 - Dr. Maria Carrington, U.S. Department of Education, approved the request to reallocate funds from the planned Math refresher course to the Math Summer Bridge program.

  • January 2017 - A meeting was held on January 27, 2017 with the Title V project director, program manager, math faculty, and the program manager of the North Harris County Education Alliance to discuss implementation of the program. Issues concerning salary, hiring of teachers from the college math department and area high schools, and curriculum development were considered.

  • April 2017 - The Lone Star College (LSC) instructors have been selected to teach MATH 1314 College Algebra for students interested in pursuing a STEM career, MATH 1332 College Math for Liberal Arts, and EDUC 1300 Learning Frameworks and the classes have been built. The program will also incorporate Aldine and Spring ISD teachers as Math Facilitators. Facilitators will observe the college Instructor’s classroom management, delivery methods, rigor, and grading policies. Facilitators also report to their campus department useful strategies to better align their College Prep math classes with college classes. Duties include distribution/collection of material, taking attendance, assisting students with note taking, tutoring, and assisting the Instructor upon request. LSC instructors and ISD math facilitators will attend a program orientation on Monday, June 5 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. The orientation will give the LSC and ISD staff the opportunity to meet before classes begin and discuss expectations of the program, instructors and students, as well as important program dates. 

    All Lone Star College students are required to attend New Student Orientation (NSO). Students participating in the program will receive their NSO and program orientation on Tuesday, June 6, 2017 from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Students will receive information about the college and the resources available to them. Students will also have the opportunity to meet their instructors, receive textbooks, receive important program dates and discuss program expectations.   

    The majority of the Summer Bridge Program’s recruiting efforts have been in the college prep classes in Aldine and Spring ISDs. These courses are for high school seniors who are not college-ready in math in their senior year. Staff members have visited classes and conducted a 20-25 minute presentation to seniors at Eisenhower High School, MacArthur High School, Aldine High School, Davis High School, Nimitz High School, Carver High School, Hall High School, Westfield High School and Wunsche High School. Additionally, staff members have attended events to promote the program including the Spring ISD Career and Technology Career Connections Expo and the Westfield High School Career Fair. The program has also received assistance from the Aldine and Spring Independent School Districts’ communication teams, principals, assistant principals, and counselors to disperse program information to students and parents. Finally, staff members attended the Lone Star College-North Harris Open House and the Lone Star College-North Harris Senior Star Visit to recruit students who plan to attend Lone Star College in the fall.  The Summer Bridge Program will host an awards ceremony for students and their family on the last day of classes. Students will receive certificates of completion for their participation in the program. Additionally, students and instructors have the opportunity to nominate students for various honors. The ceremony is designed to congratulate students on their first collegiate semester and celebrate their accomplishment with their support circle. The award ceremony will be Thursday, August 17 from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

  • June 2017 - The 2017 NHCEA Summer Bridge Program started June 6, 2017. There were 26 students enrolled, with 21 from Spring ISD and 5 from Aldine ISD. An Aldine student requested to be dropped from the program on June 27. The remaining 25 students are enrolled in College Algebra and the First Year Experience Course. Originally, the program offered Math for Liberal Arts in addition to College Algebra, but due to low enrollment, the committee decided to remove Math for Liberal Arts from the program.  
    Lone Star College instructors and Aldine ISD math facilitators attended instructor orientation June 5. The group discussed past summer bridge results, student and instructor expectations, program details, student activities and opportunities for instructor/facilitator collaboration.
    Students attended new student orientation on June 6 prior to their first class. They received Lone Star College’s New Student Orientation, program expectations and planned activities. Students completed a Pre evaluation survey, signed a letter of commitment, received their tutoring log, electronic textbook access codes, raffle punch cards, and a list of 2017 Summer Bridge sponsors. Students participated in a photoshoot on June 15, as well as a financial management workshop hosted by Wells Fargo on June 20. On the last day of the program, August 17, students and their families will attend the awards ceremony.  

  • July 2017 - As of August 1, the Summer Bridge students are entering week nine of the program. At eight weeks, they were asked about the last math class they took in high school. Of the 25 students currently enrolled, 18 responded to the questionnaire that was sent via email. All of the students took their last math class their senior year of high school. Out of the 18 students, 13 (72.2%) took Pre-Calculus, 4 (22.2%) took Math College Prep, and 1 (5.5%) took Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics. At eight weeks, 6 (33%) expect to make an A in College Algebra class, 14 (50%) a B, 2 (11.1%) a C, and 1 (5.6%) expect to make a D.
    The program has decided to add a civic engagement session to correspond with the EDUC 1300 course. Pasadena Councilman Coy Wheeler and Asdrubal Gutierrez, Community Engagement Coordinator Office of Commissioner Rodney Ellis, will be speaking to the students about the importance of civic engagement and register interested students to vote.

  • August 2017 - The Summer Bridge Math program ended on August 17. Students took their finals, received their program t-shirts, took a photo with Dr. Steve Head, Chancellor of the Lone Star College System, and Dr. Gerald Napoles, President of Lone Star College-North Harris, and completed their end of summer evaluations.  Later that evening, the program hosted its first awards ceremony. Students, their family, Dr. Head and Dr. Napoles, along with other Lone Star College administrators and partners of the North Harris County Education Alliance attended. The ceremony celebrated students’ accomplishments over the 11-week program, as well as the donors who helped make the 2017 Summer Bridge Program possible.
    The preliminary results for the 2017 Summer Bridge program show that successful completion (A, B, C) for the 2017 cohort had higher success rates than the 2016 and 2015 cohort when comparing MATH 1314 College Algebra over the course of three years. At 56.0%, the cohort successful completion rate was comparable to the control group rate of 55.9% 

  • September 2017 - The committee has begun to work on the 2018 Summer Bridge Program. The group is looking at data and participant feedback to reevaluate the website, application process, marketing, instructors, facilitators and the budget. The 2018 program will offer Math 0310-Intermediate Math instead of Math 1332-Mathematics for Liberal Arts. Students who do not test into College Algebra and take Math for Liberal Arts, must take Intermediate Math before taking College Algebra if they change their minds and decide to pursue a degree in the STEM field. By offering Intermediate Math, the committee hopes to give students more flexibility, as many are undecided on a major.

  • October 2017 -  The Summer Bridge Program began recruiting at the CAT 5 Preview Day. On November 3rd, seniors from Spring ISD and Aldine ISD came to Lone Star College-North Harris to discover different program offerings and student organizations. The committee collected 149 names and email addresses of students interested in the Summer Bridge Program. The committee has created the 2018 poster to distribute to schools and is working on updating the parent letter and website.

  • November 2017 -  During the month of November, the faculty lead initiated an order for the Interpreter Training equipment and searched for more podcasts to be used by students in the Medical Settings and Legal Settings classes. He also developed the adjunct job description for the office of Continuing Education, including minimum/preferred requirements. In an effort to recruit qualified instructors, the lead visited the Interpreting Program at the University of Houston Downtown and attended the Houston Interpreting and Translation Association’s meeting to provide information about the program.
     

  • January 2018 - The Math Collaborative Action Network (CAN), a committee of college, school district and community members, has begun recruiting for the 2018 Summer Bridge program. The 2018 program application and the Aldine ISD scholarship application are available for completion on the Summer Bridge Program website at http://www.lonestar.edu/30132.htm .  The Summer Bridge program manager has contacted the Spring ISD Education Foundation and the Spring ISD Career and Technical Education Advisory Board to ask for scholarship donations at their February meetings. The Aldine ISD Education Foundation has agreed to allow the program to use the remaining funds from 2017 to support six Aldine students (three TASFA and three FASFA eligible students) and to purchase textbooks for Aldine students. Students who have expressed interest in the program in fall were contacted in mid-January. The program manager met with Aldine ISD’s Director of Guidance, Counseling and At-Risk Students, and Spring ISD’s Coordinator of College Readiness, to discuss the collaboration between the NHCEA and the school districts. Both districts are excited about the upcoming program and vow to help in any capacity to ensure their students are represented in the 2018 program.
     

  • February 2018 -  Recruiting during the OneGoal classes in Aldine ISD has gone well. Staff visited five high school and had direct contact with approximately 105 students. Of the 105 who attended, 22 completed the interest form to receive additional information.  In February, the Bridge Program was in contact with approximately 510 students and 99 students completed the interest form.

  • August 2018 -  The 2018 Summer Bridge program ended on August 16 with a closing ceremony attended by the college President and Vice Presidents of Instruction and Student Services. Twenty-four students enrolled in this year’s program with 77% successfully completing the program with an A, B, or C and 71% persisting to the fall 2018 semester.  The success rate for College Algebra increased 23% going from 60% in summer 2017 to 83% while the success rate for the Student Success course decreased 4% from 96% to 92%. There was also an 11.7% increase in the developmental studies Intermediate Algebra course, which was last offered in the summer 2016 program.Seventy-six percent of the students were Hispanic (43%) and African American (33%) and came from 10 area high schools. Seventy-one percent stated that they planned to attend Lone Star College in the fall and 76% responded that getting a good education was important to them. The results of the survey are attached.
    Based on responses from the 2018 Summer Bridge Program End of Summer Evaluations, 77% of respondents agreed that the Summer Bridge Program helped them connect to the college. Seventy percent strongly agreed that they became more familiar with campus resources, supports and services such as tutoring, computer labs, library, and financial aid. Sixty-seven percent completed the FASFA for summer financial aid and attended an average of three tutoring hours a week. Ninety-one percent of the students thought that mandatory tutoring was necessary and 81% responded that it motivated them to get the help they needed.  When asked to describe their favorite aspects of the program students made the following comments:
    ? All the help and support offered from peers and staff.
    ? I got to start college early and learn about campus programs and services.
    ? The great instructors allowed me to become more involved and prepared for the future.
    ? That everyone was really friendly when it came down to schoolwork.

  • DS English Alternative Delivery Options

    Enables students to take more advanced courses while concurrently receiving instruction targeted on individual needs by developing materials for use in alternative course delivery frameworks at the lower level of DS English instruction. Project Updates. Top

    • January 2017 - On January 31, 2017, the program manager and project director met with the four Developmental Studies (DS) English professors who are receiving release time to develop materials for use in alternative course delivery frameworks such as Non-Course Based Options (NCBOs), Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) and flipped classrooms at the lower level of DS instruction. The faculty are focusing on the scope, course delivery, and content materials to support ENGL 0304 Developmental Reading I and ENGL 0306 Developing Writing I. The Multimedia Studio will provide the appropriate technical support to deliver the content. It was recommended that the faculty look at the online materials developed by a math faculty at http://nhmath.lonestar.edu/Faculty/TurnellE/0308/0308.html that contain Instructor Notes, Videos, Quizzes, Assignments, and Answers as a model. As soon as the multimedia coordinator is hired, a meeting will be held with the new hire, the faculty and the LSC-North Harris instructional designer. The faculty were reminded that they needed to submit monthly Time and Effort forms.

      March 2017 - In order to get a clearer picture of the students who typically place into the lowest developmental reading and writing classes, the four faculty members read and discussed research about students who demonstrate moderate to low executive functioning with the aim of addressing some needs of this population either through activities or outside intervention. After determining that these students needed more intensive instruction, the faculty are designing a four-day-a-week program to address a number of issues. These include building in the intensive work developmental students need, decreasing the time spent in developmental coursework, identifying additional supports to complete the DS sequence and gateway courses, and reducing the sequence of developmental classes to a scale that yields the best results. The faculty complied and analyzed the course-offering schedule for the last four semesters to make clear recommendations about the new delivery method of instruction, shared this blueprint with the DS English chair, interim dean, and fulltime faculty, and have received enthusiastic support.  

      After reviewing the student learning outcomes for the courses, the faculty determined that a portable assessment for both the reading and writing courses would benefit the instructors who receive the students after the first eight weeks are completed. Students who pass the course will progress to the integrated reading/writing course the second eight weeks.  Those who do not pass will enter a more targeted course of instruction based on the results of their portable assessments, tied to sample assignments and calibration training. Faculty are currently drafting rubrics and sample assessment activities as well as an online grammar/editing video module with sample exercises.

      April 2017 - Faculty have worked in April to develop in more detail the course content to explore their concerns about student access to the materials, to consider how the format of their work will help the instructional designer once he begins, and to provide chair and dean with updates so that he can promote the program for the spring 2018 semester.

      The team has spent much time during April structuring the course shells for ENGL 0304 Reading I and ENGL 0306 Writing I. The purpose of these shells is to aid them as they organize the specific activities they are developing to support the students. Tied to best practices and the course learning outcomes, faculty have scaffolded sample assignments that are not tied to any one instructor or book.  With the help of the instructional designer, they want to optimize ways for individual instructors to modify the specifics of their own assignments but provide them with a structure and sequence of activities that are likely to promote success. Besides the organizational piece, faculty have also explored various online materials to aid class instruction and to serve as resources for students outside class.  If a student misses class, she can access the online materials to stay caught up; if a student needs additional time to understand course assignments, the online materials become a powerful resource to draw on besides the printed texts.  Many of the struggling ENGL 0304 and ENGL 0306 students can benefit from multiple exposures to audio and visual texts, ones that are short and that target specific skills and strategies.

      The more the team developed the structure and the materials, the more they realized they needed to begin conceptualizing the portable assessments.  They spent a number of meetings discussing the kinds of assessment that would best reflect the mastery of the course outcomes for ENGL 0304 and ENGL 0306.  Currently, they are in the process of developing specific samples of final exams for these courses.  These exams, like the materials in the course shells, are not meant to be the only exams used; instead, they are to demonstrate the kind of final assessment that evaluates how well students can demonstrate mastery of course outcomes.  Specifically, a guiding principle is to create exams/capstone projects that ask students to demonstrate the skills and strategies they have been learning all semester with fewer scaffolded activities.  The team feels strongly that the students should be presented with a final based on the semester’s instruction and the course learning outcomes.

      As the faculty worked on the course materials, they had to confront the issue of in-class student access to the electronic materials.  Because the division has so few computer classrooms and finding regular access to electronic classrooms has become more difficult over the last few years, they realized they needed to explore ways they might guarantee greater amounts of computer time during class.  It has been usual practice for the upper-level DS and college English classes to be assigned to the computer classrooms.  As the writing programs move more to multi-modal forms of composition, the chances of being assigned to computer classrooms will become even more problematic.  While it is true that ENGL 0304 and ENGL 0306 students can tap into the materials out of class through D2L, the Lone Star learning management system, much of the curricular work that the faculty have done requires in-class access as well.  The team has created an online repository in D2L of all the documents they have created and the materials they have collected so that they can continue to refine all materials at any time.  As they complete the project, they will be able to finalize materials for easy access by others outside the team.  Because they are at the end of the semester and the instructional designer has not begun working on the project yet, the faculty have worked to develop storyboards so that once the designer begins in mid-May, he will have access to the materials and can begin to read and analyze them.  The team members will make themselves available to the designer this summer as he has the opportunity to design and develop their web presence. 

      May 2017 - As the semester ends as well as the course release time to work on class format and materials, the Title V Match Team for Developmental English commented on their progress.

      The intent is to have a clear method for course assessment by the fall to pilot in the English 0304 and English 0306 classes taught by Title V Team members and other interested faculty.  This distributed assessment is tied to sample assignments and calibration training. Finally, they recognize that strong assessment of outcomes can affect best classroom practices and ensure consistency of standards across sections. To promote this stance, they have designed assessments that avoid the testing of discrete activities and skills.  The assessment cycle also allows for continued teaching throughout the semester as instructors assess steps in the processes.  The team currently has the final assessment completed for English 0306 Writing I and are in the process of completing the final for 0304 Reading I.  Faculty members have worked to tie the assessments to the specific course outcomes listed for each course.  Besides developing a model for English 0306 final, they have collected sample student portfolios and had them digitized. These samples from a spring 2017 section of Writing I will serve as the initial anchor set used for calibration training in the fall. Because much of the work faculty have done relies on students’ having electronic access to class materials and resources, the Title V Team has submitted a proposal for purchasing mobile laptops for Developmental English.  Wanting to ensure that students in Reading I and Writing I have equal access to relevant pedagogy, the Team wishes to address the fact that the current classrooms do not have the kind of learning environment students need.  Besides securing access through mobile laptops, the Team has formulated other ideas listed under Concerns and Recommendations.

      To best use the instructional designer, the Team discussed the strategies for collaborating with him.  They are planning to have him meet with the faculty teaching this summer, sitting in on some classes to understand the workings of Reading I and Writing I.  As faculty continue to finalize and annotate the documents over the course of the summer, they want the designer to familiarize himself with the various documents and activities they have developed so that in the fall when he begins his work, the Team, in collaboration with the designer, can develop delivery methods that follow best practices.  Understanding that this designer will have responsibilities other than working with the DS English Team, the faculty expect that the designer’s priority in the fall will be to complete the work for Developmental English so that it can be fully operational by the spring when the project moves to a full pilot, involving all the sections.  The designer’s work will be crucial if the support the DS English students need to be successful is embedded in the classes.

      Besides the work of the instructional designer in the fall, the Team has developed a plan for the first stages of professional development.  Since the faculty will be piloting all the materials they have developed for the project so far, excluding the 8-week/8-week format, they want to invite all the lower level DS English faculty to participate in the limited pilot in the fall.  The team plans to invite anyone teaching the targeted courses, as well as anyone interested in teaching one in the future, to join a group meeting regularly.  They plan to start with the assessment instruments and set up a training schedule based on what their colleagues wish to focus on.  Focusing in the beginning on assessment allows faculty to acquaint their colleagues with the range of skill level entering students have, as well as show their fellow teachers the kind of progress that is possible.  This part of the training is especially important since people teaching the courses for the first time can be easily overwhelmed in the beginning of the semester.  This strategy will allow the team to acquaint faculty with the work they have done, to provide materials they have developed, and to discuss pedagogical concerns.  As a part of their professional development plan, the team will collaborate with the Writing Center to involve their tutors as well.

    • June 2017 –The theme for the team’s June work was tying together loose ends. The Creating Our Own Handbook project was finished and uploaded into the shared module in D2L.  This activity took a slightly different direction from the plan.  Two versions were created: one for students and one for instructors, with an explanation about the theoretical underpinnings for the project. The instructor’s version, a portion that was not originally planned, is to serve as an aid for instructors who feel somewhat insecure in their own abilities to teach language and grammar.  From the very beginning, the team has worked to develop materials that provide not only a clear direction but also valuable resources.
      Further development on the ENGL 0304 Reading I portable assessment is in progress.  Now that the structure for the ENGL 0306 Writing I assessment has been mapped out, the Reading I assessment should follow a similar format for the purpose of consistency for both instructors and students.  Materials that are more specific will be developed during summer II and ready for the training in the fall semester.
      Another project that has been completed is the compilation of typical editing and language errors made by students in Reading I and Writing I. These errors were compiled from analyzing a number of Writing I student essays.  Part of the process was to categorize the errors so that faculty could use these samples to target instruction. Ideally, samples could be used for introduction to editing practices with classes or individual students, as well as to train students to use the editing log that was created in the spring.  For instructors new to teaching Reading I and Writing I, these compiled errors are a starting resource to help them begin to work with their students.  Furthermore, along with the digitized writing portfolios, we see these materials as effective orienting documents for anyone teaching the new 8-week format when we begin in the spring.
      Much email communication has evolved over June regarding the new statewide placement scores to be implemented as of July 31, 2017. The Lone Star College Manager for Developmental is scheduling meetings across the system to update advisors of this plan, and will be at LSC-North Harris on Monday, July 24 for this purpose.
       The lowering of the standards will now make some students eligible for college-level courses, including students who would have placed in the upper-level integrated reading and writing course. Implementation is scheduled to begin as soon as possible.  Though ostensibly the policy change would only affect ENGL 0309 Integrated Reading/Writing, we have tried to discern if the changes to the upper-level placement will affect placement into ENGL 0304 or ENGL 0306.  It would appear that the changes would have little if any effect; however, so many issues have been undecided that we are still wary.  As of now, a full-scale placement into ABE programs for the lowest scoring students has not been an option, though some cross system discussions are taking place about possibilities.  If such changes were implemented, the English Team would need to evaluate the work we have done in light of these modifications.
      Much of the team’s work has been predicated on developing storyboards so that the electronic access capabilities would serve the needs of our students.  However, since the multimedia coordinator has yet to be hired, no meeting has taken place, no plan has been mapped out for the collaboration, and no policy has been set for how the designer will do the work necessary before the pilot is fully implemented in spring 2018.

    • August 2017 - The main activity for the Developmental Studies (DS) English Team was to update the Title V stakeholders and the faculty at large at the Faculty Institute Program on August 21. The purpose of the Institute was to share the extensive work that had been completed on all the Title V initiatives by the start of the fall semester. Specifically, the DS English Team discussed their work on instructional delivery, curriculum redesign, and ideas for professional development. The team took questions from the audience about how to access the work they had done, as well as the thinking behind their curricular and instructional decisions. Faculty has continued to refine materials and assignments to pilot in two fall sections of English 0304 Reading I and two sections of ENGL 0306 Writing I before transitioning all sections to the newly-designed eight-week format in spring 2018. Here is an overview of the materials that have been developed to support this Title V MATCH initiative:  Click here:   DS English Curriculum

    • September 2017 -  Though technically the release time for the English team ended in mid-May with the end of the spring semester, faculty have continued to work on the project as they have moved into the fall semester.
      The main activity for the English MATCH Team was to meet with  the new multimedia coordinator who will be supporting the Title V grant projects. The purpose of this meeting was to acquaint the multimedia coordinator with the storyboards for the work and open a discussion of how the materials the team has developed can be digitized for easy access by ENGL 0304 Reading I and ENGL 0306 Writing I students. Specifically, the English MATCH Team speculated about possible directions on instructional delivery, curriculum redesign, and ideas for professional development. All those present agreed that the next course of action was to meet at a time when members of the team could bring one specific piece of the project and work through possibilities. The team will work with the LSC-North Harris curriculum designer to work on how to utilize other campus resources to improve the technology in their curriculum.
      Two full-time instructors  have begun to pilot some of the materials developed for both reading and writing. Their pilot will inform decisions about possible professional development and implementation for the spring.

Teaching Squares

Provides faculty an opportunity to gain new insight into their teaching through a non-evaluative
process of reciprocal classroom observation and self-reflection. The four faculty in each “teaching
square” visit each other’s classes over the course of a semester and meet to discuss what they have learned from their observations. Project Updates. Top

  • October 2016 - The Adjunct Center for Excellence (ACE) has established as one of its strategic objectives to implement Teaching Squares to expose adjunct faculty to diverse teaching strategies that lead to student engagement and student success. The purpose of this is to ensure that there is a sustained focus on Title V objectives and success indicators to meet our project goal of creating a welcoming student-centered learning environment to increase the persistence, completion, and graduation rates of our Hispanic and underserved students.  

  • December 2016 - Guidelines for Teaching Squares have been developed to provide faculty an opportunity to gain new insight into their teaching through a non-evaluative process of reciprocal classroom observation and self-reflection. The four faculty in each "teaching square" agree to visit each other's classes over the course of a semester and then meet to discuss what they learned from their observations. By allowing faculty to be "learners" again in their colleagues' classes, Teaching Squares opens up unique spaces for reflection and conversation about teaching.

  • January 2017 - The lead has identified several faculty interested in Teaching Squares.

  • February 2017 - Teaching Squares will be fully developed and implemented by fall, 2017.

  • May 2017 - A Teaching Squares program will expand the mentoring program structure in fall 2017, and participants may continue to participate with the same partner (or someone else), but even if they do not, they will report back in November regarding the results of changes the new approaches they identified this spring have had on their teaching.

  • August 2017 -  The matching up of the faculty Squares particpants will be completed this fall with an implementation by Spring 2018. 

  • January 2018 - A new phase of mentoring—with the dual pairs expanded to groups of four (“teaching squares”), will be piloted before the end of this semester, with an eye towards scaling up in Fall 2018. 
     

  • May 2018 - Two four-member groups of volunteers were formed in May, and will function during June/July 2018 as early ‘beta’ versions of the program. The program will have its formal guidelines published at the beginning of the fall semester. Furthermore, recruiting has begun for the formation of at least three more teaching squares, made up of the remaining volunteers from spring 2018 as well as faculty members selected by deans/chairs of three additional academic areas.  When fully functional, these new units, along with the two summer cohorts, would make a minimal starting cohort of five groups—or twenty (20) faculty as Fall 2018 Teaching Squares. 

  • August 2018 - After the success of the Title V Adjunct Faculty Mentoring program for 2017-18 (which is continuing this fall), the new Teaching Squares program is coming online as of October 1. The program was promoted to faculty and adjuncts during the Summer 2018 Faculty Institute, Fall 2018 Faculty Institute, and Adjunct Boot Camp. Instead of two faculty members working together, as in mentoring, Teaching Squares will function with faculty members forming groups of four, united by a common teaching interest or discipline. They will meet once to get organized, then do observations of each other’s classes, and finally meet together late in the semester to share reflections on how their teaching has improved or can improve instuction.

  • September 2018 - Program flyers and the handbook for Teaching Squares were revised over the  summer.   Professional Development also launched the online enrollment for Teaching Squares.  An email invitation was sent out to faculty to enroll in the programs.  Orientations for both the Adjunct Mentoring and Teaching Squares programs are scheduled for October  2nd and 3rd.   

Adjunct Boot Camp

Offers relevant professional development activities and training throughout the year to new and experienced adjunct faculty on student-centered instruction. Project Updates. Top

  • October 2016 - The Adjunct Center for Excellence (ACE) has established as one of its strategic objectives to establish an Adjunct Boot Camp to provide relevant professional development activities and training for new and experienced adjunct faculty in alignment with the Title V grant.  The purpose of this is to ensure that there is a sustained focus on Title V objectives and success indicators to meet our project goal of creating a welcoming student-centered learning environment to increase the persistence, completion, and graduation rates of our Hispanic and underserved students. 

  • December 2016 - The program manager and project director met with the program manager of the Faculty and Staff Center and the Faculty Fellow for the Adjunct Center for Excellence on December 14, 2016. Plans are being made to hold an Adjunct Boot Camp on January 21, 2016. Presenters have been selected and faculty recruited for participation.

  • January 2017 - An Adjunct Boot Camp was held on January 21, 2017 with 35 instructors attending. Human Resources and Payroll have approved the mentors and mentee stipends. The lead has identified several mentors who have agreed to participate as well as faculty interested in Teaching Squares.

  • July 2017 - The Adjunct Boot Camp waa scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Topics will include Title V mentoring, CAST Writing support, and the WAC program.

  • August 2017 -  Due to Hirricane Harvey, the Bootcamp was re-scheduled to September 16. 

  • September 2017 - The Fall Adjunct Boot Camp began with breakfast and opening remarks by North Harris President Gerald Napoles, Vice President of Instruction Laura Yannuzzi, and Faculty Senate President Bob Lynch. They welcomed sixty-nine adjunct professors to a semester that was still feeling the effects of Hurricane Harvey, which caused the loss of a week’s class time and a number of homes, both of students and of faculty members, some of whom were still struggling for basic needs. The tone of the morning was upbeat, however, with strong responses from the participants to several presentations. Sandra Velazquez and Michael McFarland introduced the Adjunct Center/Faculty Staff Center staff and provided a review of services, including computer help, instructional assistance, printing, dining, lounge, lockers, and a coffee pot that is always on.
    Cynthia Shade, online instructional designer, spoke about the features of online teaching—features of D2L, instructional strategies, and special prizes for participants answering D2L trivia questions.
    Michael McFarland made a presentation on student fears, and how students create strategies out of those fears—which may work for or against learning (source: The College Fear Factor: how students and professor misunderstand one another, by Rebecca Cox).
    Christopher Winkler, North Harris adjunct faculty, spoke to participants about the value of conversations with colleagues about teaching, particularly as facilitated by the Title V Faculty Mentoring Program, which was taking applications. Since- that day, more than forty faculty members have signed up for the program, and will attend an orientation in October. A copy of The College Fear Factor will be provided to each participant—as a stimulus for conversations--and they may continue in the program through the Spring, 2018 semester. The program requires a minimum of one class observation and feedback session per participant.  After a short break, the morning’s cornerstone was a presentation by Dean of Academic Affairs Anne Albarelli, who presented an overview of Title V, Mi Casa Es Su Casa (Connect – Adapt – Succeed – Achieve). These included the three primary initiatives. IMALLS (Information Technology Enhanced Multi-Disciplinary Academic Learning Lounges) and CAST (Center for Academic Success and Transition) will connect students with college resources to increase academic preparedness and engagement. The third initiative, MATCH (Meaningfully Aligned Targeted Curriculum/Courses for Hispanic and Underserved Students) intends to match instruction with students’ needs based on proven methods.

  • December 2017 - Planning began for the Adjunct Boot Camp, scheduled for Saturday, February 17, 2018 at LSC-Greenspoint Center.  

  • February 2018 -  An Adjunct Faculty Boot Camp took place February 17 at Greenspoint Center. Sixty (60) adjunct faculty participated in a three-hour Saturday conference including a keynote and two breakout sessions featuring workshops on helping students to learn skills of relating to professors, engagement with coursework, and providing feedback via D2L. Faculty also learned how to use mobile apps in class and how to access a variety of online professional development tools.

  • August 2018 - Sixty-five adjunct faculty participated in a three-hour Saturday Adjunct Boot Camp on Saturday, August 25, 2018 at the new Construction & Skilled Trades Technology Center. The program started with a welcome from the President, Dr. Napoles and the VP of Instruction, Dr. Yannuzzi. The sessions focused on topics that allow adjunct faculty to best prepare for the semester. They included workshops on activities for building connections with students, library resources and services, an overview of updates to D2L, and a technology open lab. Many adjunct faculty took advantage of having access to the Instructional Designer, and employees from Adjunct Center for Excellence as well as the Faculty and Staff Center during the open lab to review class rosters, upload their syllabi, post announcements to students, set up a gradebook and/or attendance log in D2L.

21st Century Faculty Institute

Provides development and training to full-time faculty on yearly themes chosen and best practices discussed, studied and implemented in the classroom. Project Updates. Top

October 2016 - The Faculty and Staff Center (FSC) has established as one of its strategic objectives to design a Faculty Institute  provide relevant professional development activities and training for full-time faculty on how to address the needs and learning styles of 21st-century learners. The purpose of this is to ensure that there is a sustained focus on Title V objectives and success indicators to meet our project goal of creating a welcoming student-centered learning environment to increase the persistence, completion, and graduation rates of our Hispanic and underserved students.  

  • February 2017 - Title V grant funds purchased a subscription to the 20-Minute Mentor Newsletter. The 20-Minute Mentor Commons is an on-demand video-based professional development program, specifically designed to focus on diversity training and innovative instructional techniques for faculty. The on-demand video programs have been thoughtfully designed to answer specific questions related to teaching and learning. Moreover, the on-demand availability of these 20-minute presentations are ideal to fit the busy schedules of our faculty. The Faculty and Staff Center sends out a bi-monthly newsletter highlighting 2-3 topics of interest.
     
  • March 2017 - The Faculty and Staff Center released two editions of the online professional development newsletter to support the annual theme of engaging a diverse population of students. Modules included Implementing Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Getting Useful Feedback to Improve Online Teaching, Assessing Critical Thinking with Student-Centered Work, Teaming Grit with a Growth Mindset to Cultivate Lifelong Learning, Designing Academic Integrity into Online Programs, and Grading Policy Options as an Influence to Student Learning. Currently, eight faculty have registered for the online training modules and viewed seven programs. These are Assigning Students to Groups, Getting Started with the Virtual Classroom, Creating an Online Education Policy and Procedures Manual. Overcoming Faculty Barriers to Online Teaching, Creating a Welcoming Online Classroom, Making Online Group Projects More Effective, and Activities and Assignments to Promote Critical Thinking.
     
  • April 2017 - The Faculty and Staff Center (FSC) released two editions of the online professional development 20-Minute Mentor Newsletter in April to support the annual theme of engaging a diverse population of students. Modules included Addressing Critical Thinking with Objective Items, Laying the Groundwork for Positive Technology Changes, Designing Copyright Compliant Courses, Creating an Online Service Learning Project, and Getting Useful Feedback to Improve Online Teaching. Currently, 14 faculty have accessed these online trainings with six new registrants in April.  In addition, FSC developed a Title V infographic and information sheet to promote the Title V activities. Finally, they interviewed candidates for the Multimedia Coordinator position.
     
  • May 2017 - A panel session has been scheduled for the fall 2017 Faculty Institute on August 21 to discuss progress on the Title V writing initiatives. Faculty participating in the CAST Tutoring, Writing Across the Curriculum, and Developmental English redesign projects will share details and discuss how these initiatives are complementing each other and how the writing assignments can enrich the courses of all writing instructors.  The Faculty and Staff Center distributed the eighth edition of the Title V online professional development program, 20 Minute Mentor. Topics included How Student Learning Can Begin before the First Day of Class; What to Do When a Student Cheats; and How to Adapt an Online Faculty Peer Review Tool.
  • June 2017 – The Faculty and Staff Center has developed an intranet site where faculty can access the previous articles of the 20-Minute Mentor Newsletter together with registration instructions.  
    Plans for the Fall 2017 Faculty Institute are being finalized. The featured Title V programs will include CAST Tutoring, Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC), and Developmental Writing.  Panel discussions will inform faculty from other disciplines how writing assignments can enrich their courses. They will also provide faculty with an overview of how the Title V Grant WAC program is funding peer tutors (current students with 3.0+ GPA’s and a final grade of A/B in Freshman English) to work directly with history and government students working on their assigned writing projects as well as updates to the Developmental Writing program.

  • July 2017 - Plans for the Fall 2017 Faculty Institute have been finalized. The Institute will be held on Monday, August 21, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. The program will include an overview of Mi Casa Es Su Casa and updates on the various initiatives funded through the Title V grant. Panel discussions will inform faculty from other disciplines how writing assignments can enrich their courses, provide faculty with an overview of how the WAC program is funding peer tutors to work directly with history and government students working on their assigned writing projects, and describe the redesign of the lower level developmental reading and writing program.  The Faculty and Staff Center has developed an intranet site where faculty can access the previous articles of the 20-Minute Mentor Newsletter together with registration instructions.

  • August 2017 -  Seventy faculty members attended the Faculty Institute on August 21, 2017. Part I of the program of this cross discipline professional development event featured a panel of Title V project leads summarizing their various initiatives and taking questions from the faculty. The manager of the CAST Career Center provided information on the transfer and career services offered, and the CAST tutor faculty fellow discussed the services offered to DS English and EDUC 1300 students. The Multimedia Lab supervisor talked about the new staff as well as equipment for the new Title V Multimedia Studio. The Library Director invited faculty to visit the Makerspace area and described the services to students and faculty that utilize the latest technology. Presentations on the MATCH projects included DS English faculty explaining the changes in curriculum that will occur this coming spring due to the Title V redesign of the lower level reading and writing curriculum. Tutoring and support services available through Writing Across the Curriculum, an extensive description of the Professional Development for faculty, and a description of the new English/ Spanish Interpreter program made possible through Title V were also discussed.  Part II presented other campus programs affecting faculty—enhanced Writing Center services due to drastically lower cut scores in writing for college-readiness, campus-wide writing projects, review of LSC 20/20 system-wide beliefs training, international studies program, faculty excellence selection process, and faculty senate invitation by President Bob Lynch. Campus-wide syllabus information was available, plus a sheet updating faculty on the latest campus-carry information.  Fifteen faculty and tutors attended this seminar style institute in the Writing Center on August 22, 2017. Featured presentations by writing faculty who are steeped in current scholarship included Teaching the Students We Have: Promoting Engagement and Rigor and The Real Value of Student Work.
     

  • November 2017 -  The Spring 2018 Faculty Institute will be held on January 9, 2018 and Lone Star College-North Harris has secured the well-known author and educator Professor Terry Doyle as the keynote speaker. Professor Doyle is the author of three books that focus on the application of neuroscience, biology and cognitive science to teaching and learning.

  • December 2017 - In December the planning for the Spring 2018 Faculty Institute was finalized, including a contract for keynote speaker Terry Doyle, and a Save the Date was sent to all faculty.

  • January 2018 - The Spring 2018 Faculty Institute (18) took place January 9 and was a program for full-time and adjunct faculty, with adjuncts offered an hourly stipend for participating.  Eighteen (18) adjunct faculty attended and received Title V stipends for three hours of stipend pay—the keynote and the two hours of presentations.   The program featured a talk by nationally renowned educator and author Terry Doyle, who emphasized the learning process and how it is affected by biological and cognitive factors.   In the course of his talk, he emphasized the crucial way that developing a relationship with today’s students affects their learning, particularly since the brain continues to develop through the age of 25. The talk was very well received, and was followed by two rounds of breakout sessions on learning strategies and issues like writing across the curriculum (a Title V initiative), apps in the classroom, active learning, and expanding professional development.   Of particular interest, following the breakout presentations, was a closing session with the campus VP of Instruction, Laura Yannuzzi, who invited adjunct and full-time faculty to find times and opportunities to exchange best practices.  She announced a new move by three divisions to schedule classes for Fall 2018 around a one-hour open period around lunchtime to allow faculty to gather in “lunch and learn sessions” without a teaching conflict.  These will provide a good opportunity for Title V professional development offerings next fall. 
    The following day, January 10, a Faculty Institute for Writing was offered for English full-time and adjunct English faculty—focusing on learning issues in ENGL 1301.  One adjunct faculty member attended and received a Title V stipend for the two-hour session.  More in-house sessions (faculty presenting to other faculty within a discipline) are being promoted and encouraged, but must be faculty-driven to be effective. 
     

  • May 2018 - The Faculty Development Advisory Council, in collaboration with Professional Development and Educational Services, met on May 2 and is now excited to announce the first Faculty Summer Institute! Sponsored by Title V. This four-day faculty development opportunity will focus on using instructional technology to build connections within a course, connections to content, to the real world, to one another.  Whether teaching students in person, online, or a combination of the two, faculty will learn the best practices for using a variety of technological tools to create or redesign course content. 
    Schedule: The Summer Institute will occur July 30 – August 3, 2018 from 8:30am to 3:30pm. Each day will consist of a morning session, lunchbreak, and an afternoon session.  During each session, a power user/subject matter expert will provide instruction and demonstration of an instructional technology tool.  Then, participants will have the opportunity to create or redesign an assignment within their course with the assistance of that expert. The hands-on approach to the institute will give participants incredible access to power users/experts as well as the time and space to incorporate the tools that seem the most impactful for their course. The topics for the Summer Institute include using content creation tools (such as video resources and SoftChalk), collaborative learning tools (such as Padlet and Now Comment), and communication tools (such as WebEx).  
    Selection Criteria:  All full-time and adjunct faculty members who have taught at LSC-North Harris or one if its centers (CHI, Greenspoint, Health Professions Building, and Victory Center) during the 2017-2018 academic year are eligible to apply. There are only twenty spaces available for this highly interactive four-day learning experience.  Applicants must demonstrate interest in creative instruction, initiative in improving teaching and career skills, and competence in handling assigned tasks.  In addition, participants must agree to implement at least one of the strategies learned during the institute in their fall 2018 course(s).  
    Applications:  Faculty were highly interested in participating in the Title V sponsored Summer Institute.  All applications were due by 8:00 am on Monday, May 21, 2018.  We received a total of 24 applications, 13 full-time faculty and 11 adjunct faculty. 

  • July 2018 - This summer eight full-time faculty members from the Business and EDUC 1300 disciplines formed two Teaching Squares groups as a way of trying out the format to be inaugurated in fall 2018. As experienced participants in the Faculty Mentoring Program in the spring, they were “fired up” about the four-person group idea and wanted to experiment.
    One group had an organizational meeting and decided to focus on ways to bring current resources more effectively into their classrooms. They then did a round of class observations and met in a wrap up meeting to reflect on this particular focus and to discuss how it could improve their teaching. It so happened that all of them will be dealing with implementation of a new textbook in the course they teach, so that gave the meeting an additional layer of application.
    The second group met once and due to unforeseen summer schedule complications, were not able to meet again. However, they are determined to re-activate their group as participants in the fall program coming up.

  • August 2018 - Forty-six faculty attended the Faculty Institute on Monday, August 20, 2018. The program was for full-time and adjunct faculty. Faculty and adjuncts participated in small group discussions to brainstorm solutions and opportunities for meeting the instructional challenges of the classroom. The groups spent time collaborating with colleagues from other disciplines to create assignments, projects, and initiatives or share expertise. Of the 46 participants, nine were adjunct faculty.

Adjunct Mentoring Program

Matches small groups of new adjunct faculty members with graduates of the Faculty Institute who serve as their mentors to create a cohort peer group that strengthens the mentoring experience. Project Updates. Top

  • October 2017 - The Adjunct Center for Excellence (ACE) has established as one of its strategic objectives to establish an Adjunct Mentoring Program. The purpose of this is to ensure that there is a sustained focus on Title V objectives and success indicators to meet our project goal of creating a welcoming student-centered learning environment to increase the persistence, completion, and graduation rates of our Hispanic and underserved students. 
     
  • December 2016 - The Faculty Mentors for the Adjunct Mentoring Program are being identified and the job description for the Part-time specialist is being developed in cooperation with Human Resources.  An excellent On-line Mentoring video is being purchased to use as an additional tool to supplement in-person mentor training.  A Faculty Mentoring Handbook has been developed outlining the objectives, delineating responsibilities of the mentors and mentees, describing the characteristics of a successful mentor and mentee, providing guiding principles, detailing compensation, and providing schedules for meetings and activities.
     
  • January 2017 - Human Resources and Payroll have approved the mentors and mentee stipends. The lead has identified several mentors who have agreed to participate.
     
  • February 2017 - Currently, there are four mentoring/mentee groups. It was determined that fulltime faculty could mentor fulltime faculty if the mentee is a new instructor. Since the current Time and Effort form does not detail outside hours, the project manager will work with Grants Compliance on a form that is to be signed so that the fulltime faculty can keep a record as evidence that they are working outside of regular hours. The initiative lead will meet with the mentors and mentees before Spring Break and implementation is scheduled for the week after that.
     
  • March 2017 - The Faculty and Staff Center (FSC) and the Adjunct Center for Excellence (ACE) held an orientation meeting on March 8, 2017 to launch the new Adjunct Faculty Mentoring program. Currently, there are ten fulltime and adjunct faculty participating. Participants received an Adjunct Mentoring Program Guide and forms to facilitate documentation of the program. The objectives of the program are for instructors to identify strategies to improve student engagement in their own learning process, explore ways to create an atmosphere of trust in the classroom, clearly communicate expectations, increase knowledge of the college’s network of services, and gain insights into their own teaching by addressing challenges and expanding strengths. Documentation includes Activity Reports, Goals Exercise, and Classroom Observation Reports as well as an end of semester assessment of any strategies and/or practices they implemented in their own classrooms. 
     
  • May 2017 - In early March, 2017, ten Title V Mentoring faculty members participated in an orientation and goal setting session to get an overview of the program which matches a more experienced (full-time) professor with a new professor (adjunct) to observe each other’s teaching and to meet afterwards and discuss insights and ideas for change.  In the weeks following, the five teams collectively spent approximately 100 hours on activities—some, due to time/schedule restrictions, were limited to the basic classroom observation/feedback, but others expanded to additional professional development.  In early May, during the final week of class, the program wrapped up with a closing session to discuss the benefits and future ramifications.  As a part of participation, faculty completed written reflections, activity reports and an evaluation survey.   These materials are being used to improve the program beginning in fall 2017.  In addition, a Teaching Squares program will expand the mentoring program structure in fall 2017, and participants may continue to participate with the same partner (or someone else), but even if they do not, they will report back in November regarding the results of changes the new approaches they identified this spring have had on their teaching.Mentors provided insightful observations:
    • “The experiences force me to look more at each class I teach.  By explaining what I do in class, and why, I am able to understand a great deal more.”
    • “The greatest gift is the opportunity to connect with another faculty member in a more engaged way—which directly relates to the classroom where we establish connections with students and assist in their success.”
    • “I need to give students more time to discuss a question amongst themselves.”
    • [After a class observation] “Prof. --- chatted with students as they entered the room, clearly understanding each student’s situation.  He appealed to several different learning styles as he moved students into carefully conceived groups designed to strengthen their skills in English…. He showed a willingness to listen to the students and give them time to express themselves.”
    • “PowerPoint usage could be improved, and fewer repetitions of the same idea could save time—I can work with --- on that.”

      Mentees also gained important insights and skills:
    • “My mentor presented an example of simplicity and caring ways…. I identify with her so much.  I also loved her example of foresight and planning.  She is always one step ahead.” 
    • “I have learned new ways I can motivate students to succeed in their academic pursuits.” 
    • “I will spend more time adapting exercises to meet different needs and subjects.”
    • “This experience offers an opportunity to change our academic culture. I now realize the weakness of the support provided by the college for adjunct faculty, and understand why my mentor wishes to establish a stronger support system.”
    • “My goals for next semester will include more clinical case studies for community service—I also will start using more technology for assessment and for games to help students with retention of vocabulary and mechanisms.”

      Some mentoring participants planned a vigorous program of special activities beyond classroom observations of their own teaching.  Together, one mentor and mentee attended a professional development session presented by a faculty excellence award recipient and discussed the teaching techniques covered. Another pair visited a third professor’s class together and afterwards met to discuss her techniques that employed nuances of scaffolding vs. coddling.  On other occasions, the two met with an advisor who spoke about how students were placed into classes and with the campus online instructional designer to discuss the use of audio/video techniques and the incorporation of links into D2L (BrightSpace).  Additionally, some relationships did not end with the semester—one mentor/mentee pair will meet this summer in order for the mentor to guide the mentee in “a major overhaul of my syllabus.”
       
  • August 2017 - The Faculty Matters is a monthly newsletter by and for the LSC-North Harris faculty where faculty can find topics and issues related to the LSC-North Harris teaching and learning environment. In the July issue, the project lead for the Title V Adjunct Mentoring program wrote an article highlighting the program.  Click here: Mentor Newletter
     
  • September 2017 - The Faculty and Staff Center released two editions of the online professional development newsletter, 20 Minute Mentor,  to support the annual theme of engaging a diverse population of students. Topics featured in these issues included: providing feedback to students; releasing student natural zest and curiosity, designing innovative assignment, how to help students take responsibility for learning, communicating with students and creating a lively, functional online classroom.
     
  • October 2017 - On October 18, the Title V Adjunct Mentoring Program held its fall Orientation. This fall we have forty-two full-time and adjunct faculty participating in the program. Our initial four pairs from spring 2017 are included in this group. Twenty-one of the forty-two attended the orientation and the other eighteen completed the orientation online. Participants received the Title V Mentoring Program Guide, Activity Report, Classroom Observation Form, Online Observation form and Time and Effort Sheet.  Two sets of Mentor online, interactive newsletters were sent out to participants. The October 3rd 20 Minute Mentor Newsletter: Volume 1 | Issue 12 provided information on helping students take responsibility for their own learning, provided communication techniques as well as helping to create a lively, yet functional on-line classroom. The October 16th Newsletter: Volume 1 | Issue 13 provided techniques for building cognitive skills as well as aligning technology and learning objectives.
     
  • November 2017 -  The program currently has forty-two (42) professors working in pairs with a mentor and a mentee observing each other’s classes, attending professional development sessions together, and meeting for feedback and teaching strategies for engaging students.
    At the end of November, the program received reports from 26 of the participants—the remaining 16 are continuing to meet individually and will file their time and effort reports for the month of December. Those 26 faculty members reported a total of 136 hours spent in the above activities during November.
    Disciplines represented include English, ESOL, math, history, government, biology, education, welding, cosmetology, business, psychology, accounting, nursing, and digital media.
    • All are reading a book on engaging students (COLLEGE FEAR FACTOR: how professors and students misunderstand one another), and the mentoring program presented two book discussions during November in connection with the book.
    • On November 13, twenty-one (21) participants discussed the ways student fears determine behaviors in classes, and how to recognize and address the fears by leading students to discover how to study and how to ask questions to get the help they need
      (primary focus was on Chapters 2 and 4)
    • On November 28, eleven (11) participants discussed strategies professors can use in order to better listen to students (Chapter 6: “Professors Who Come Down to Our Level”)
    • On November 29, twenty-two (22) participants met to complete an evaluation survey and plan participation for Spring 2018. In addition, the Faculty and Staff Center published two issues of the 20 Minute Mentor Newsletter Issues 14 and 15. These electronic newsletters provide faculty with several on-line presentations. Issue 14 focused on effective mentoring and Issue 15 contained presentations on flipped classrooms and student engagement.
       
  • December 2017 - On December 4, the 20 Minute Mentor Newsletter: Volume 1 Issue 16 was sent to faculty. Recruitment and planning for the Spring Adjunct Mentoring Program is underway. Most of the participants that completed the Adjunct Mentoring Program will be continuing with the program in the spring. The Teaching Squares project will be piloted with a small cohort primarily recruited from the Mentor Teams.
     
  • January 2018 - Regarding the Title V Faculty Mentoring Program, participants continued during the spring semester with observations, feedback and shared professional development sessions, and with meetings to process their “take-aways.”  Program participants are all continuing to study the same book (The College Fear Factor), which focuses on how to develop strategies countering the behavior of first time college students who are capable but not prepared for college.  Discussion sessions will be offered later this semester. 
    Logistically, some challenges had to be managed—mentors or mentees dropping out and informing us late, and thus requiring a scramble to match them up with another mentor or mentee.  Most issues were resolved and we are currently at approximately thirty-five (35) participants.  No new enrollments were taken, with the exception of one or two very rare cases.  All will receive email copies of their initial goals statement, and will be requested to reflect, from a vantage point of six months later, how many were met, and how many new goals have been set.  At the end of the semester, they will be asked in a survey to comment on the effectiveness of strategies or techniques, which they learned about and tried during the term of the program (from fall to spring). 
     
  • February 2018 - In this program, participants are continuing during the spring semester with observations, feedback and shared professional development sessions, and with meetings to process their “take-aways.” Program participants are all continuing to study the same book (The College Fear Factor), which focuses on how to develop strategies countering the behavior of first time college students who are capable but not prepared for college. Logistic challenges were met, with one new mentee joining the program to replace a dropout—bringing the total participants to 36.
    One book discussion, offered on March 7 and again on March 8 (to allow for class scheduling conflicts), focused on Chapter 7 of the book: “Academic Literacies.” Ten of the 36 program participants attended.
    Mentors and mentees were reminded to complete their monthly Time and Effort forms, and urged to keep track of strategies they were adding to their classrooms as a result lessons learned through the program. In April, they will be asked to report on the level of success after these strategies were applied. A new phase of mentoring—with the dual pairs expanded to groups of four (“teaching squares”), will be introduced before the end of this semester, with an eye towards scaling up in fall 2018.
     
  • March 2018 -  A Mentor Book Discussion was held on March 7-8, 2018.  As part of our yearlong study of Rebecca Cox’s The College Fear Factor, participants met to discuss Chapter 7: “Academic Literacies” (in the final section called “Gatekeeping”). There was a review of the history of colleges in their role of preparing young adults for a profession, and conversely, for eliminating those who are undesirable (i.e., not “college material”).   A closer look at the landscape of college today reveals a continued “gatekeeping” function in all higher education—via placement exam cut scores and cutbacks in basic course offerings.  At the same time, many high school graduates enter college with inadequate preparation both in academic skills (math/reading/writing) and in academic literacy.  In other words, many are stuck at the lower levels of Bloom’s taxonomy—gathering and reporting facts without summarizing, analyzing or synthesizing (crucial skills in college courses).   Because placement scores are now lower and basic courses are being eliminated, faculty are being forced to adapt.  Many college-level courses require higher reading/writing/math skills than entering students possess, and some professors react by cutting back writing and reading assignments.  At one college, students’ reading skills after two years were lower than their entrance tests indicated—because frustrated faculty had cut back on their most rigorous reading assignments.   In our discussion, faculty participants explored the false dilemma of “lowering standards so that more students pass” vs. “maintaining rigorous standards via the professorial model,” thus creating attrition (a form of gatekeeping). Instead, they are developing pedagogical strategies drawn from a relational model, which leads students from a fixed mindset into a growth mindset (e.g., seeing a mistake not as evidence of failure but as an opportunity to learn).  In this way, faculty are able to maintain rigorous standards with higher student success. 
     
  • April 2018 -  The study of The College Fear Factor, recently completed by 35+ faculty in the Title V Mentoring Program, provided a very enlightening look at the ways to recognize fear strategies employed by first time college students, and the reactive strategies that instructors can use to create relationships that promote learning. [NOTE: See below for an outline of the whole book]. The parting message of the final chapter is that colleges today still are marked by vestiges of an earlier model that is not effective for today's students. This professorial model is evident in the college’s emphasis in content mastery over pedagogy in its hiring and evaluation of faculty.The title of the final chapter is "Re-Imagining College from the Inside Out" and its message is that if we are going to see an upturn in our students' learning, then colleges must implement a learning component for faculty, not as an option but as a core element in the workload.One sign of hope that has occurred as a parallel phenomenon, perhaps influenced indirectly by this vigorous faculty mentoring program and the ideas of this book, is the creation of a Professional Development Advisory Council at LSC-North Harris. This is not just another committee, but is a force that can build that kind of vital learning component into the work of every faculty member in the future. Teams of faculty members are working hard to plan and produce a program of faculty development through a cycle of three themes—connection through technology (Summer Institute for Faculty the week of July 30), connection through collegial communities (Fall Faculty Institute/Adjunct Boot Camp), and connection through engagement with students (Spring Faculty Institute/Adjunct Boot Camp). These plans will be brought back and approved by the general Advisory Council, which meets 3-4 times per year.  The very existence of these working groups and this advisory council’s work going forward is a hopeful sign that the college will make learning a fundamental component of every faculty member’s workload in the future.
     
  • May 2018 - The Title V Mentoring faculty submitted final surveys, with results provided below. Thirty-five faculty members, full-time and adjunct, participated in the Title V Faculty Mentoring Program for spring 2018.  The surveys showed the following interests in additional participation in the fall: 
  • ? Five faculty are interested in being presenters in a future professional development event on campus.
    ? Six faculty are interested in participating on a panel at a future professional development event.
    ? Eleven) faculty would like to participate in Teaching Squares, the next phase of the Title V Professional Development program.
    For the fall 2018 semester, Teaching Squares will continue with its own recruitment and reporting structure.  Those who completed the spring program should be invited to return, and non-completers could be re-admitted as participants on an advisory basis, assuming that they make a request.  Brand new participants can be added whenever any full-time faculty identifies an adjunct (or adjuncts) to be a mentee, and the full-time faculty would then serve as their program contact. The participants were encouraged to participate in a book study.  Almost half of participants added this activity.  It was suggested that in 2018 participants be free to choose individually from a list of recommended books which the mentor reviews and selects to study with his/her mentee (mentors would also have the prerogative not to select a book).  
     
  • June 2018 -  In June we had four EDUC faculty (Cher Brock, Tanya Jefferson, Hollie Walls, and Sharterica Washington) and four BUSI faculty (Julie Duncan, Eva Parker, Ibrahim Abou-Saad, and Hana Sulaiman) who were active in “beta” versions of Teaching Square groups during the months of May-July.  They are almost 100% alumni of the Spring 2018 Mentoring Program—and will turn in their Teaching Square documentation by July 30 for processing.  They are using forms from the mentoring program for this purpose, although a new system of forms and program requirements for both Mentoring and Teaching Squares will be available beginning Fall 2018.  Finally, in June we made final calculations on participation in the Spring 2018 Title V Faculty Mentoring Program.
     
  • September 2018 -  Program flyers and the handbook for Adjunct Mentoring was  revised over the  summer.   The Professional De[artment staff also launched online enrollment for Adjunct Mentoring.  An email invitation was sent out to faculty to enroll in the programs.  Orientations for the both the Adjunct Mentoring and Teaching Squares programs are scheduled for October  2nd and 3rd.   

True North Chair Academy

Focuses on strategic and practical approaches to developing leadership skills and institution-wide
vision for department chairs and lead faculty in both their faculty and chair responsibilities. Project Updates. Top

  • October 2017 - The Faculty and Staff Center (FSC) has established as one of its strategic objectives to establish a Chair Academy focused on strategic and practical approaches to developing leadership skills and institution-wide vision to actively assist department chairs in meeting both their faculty and chair responsibilities. The purpose of this is to ensure that there is a sustained focus on Title V objectives and success indicators to meet our project goal of creating a welcoming student-centered learning environment to increase the persistence, completion, and graduation rates of our Hispanic and underserved students.